Iran takes an anthropologist hostage to blackmail EU states

Iran has detained Franco-Iranian dual national Fariba Adelkhah, an anthropology professor at Paris' prestigious Sciences Po university. (Commons Wikimedia/Georges Seguin)
Updated 17 July 2019

Iran takes an anthropologist hostage to blackmail EU states

  • Anger in Paris as academic is arrested on espionage charges
  • France has yet to be given "satisfactory information" on her status

JEDDAH: Iran has arrested a French-Iranian academic as Tehran tries to pressure European states over the collapsing 2015 deal to curb its nuclear program.

Fariba Adelkhah, an anthropologist and senior research fellow at the Sciences Po institute in Paris, was detained three weeks ago on spying charges.

Iranian government spokesman Ali Rabiei said he had heard about the arrest but did not know who carried it out, which is how Iranian spokesmen usually refer to operations by the intelligence unit of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC). Iran has denied French diplomats access to Adelkhah, prompting anger in Paris on Monday. 

“France calls on the Iranian authorities to bring to light Mrs. Adelkhah’s situation and reiterates its requests, in particular the authorization of consular access without delay,” Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Agnes von der Muhll said.

"No satisfactory response has been given to these requests. France calls on the Iranian authorities to bring to light Mrs Adelkhah's situation and reiterates its requests, in particular the authorisation of consular access without delay," she added.

For Tehran, holding hostages is a political and ideological exercise, and a form of leverage against other countries

Dr. Majid Rafizadeh, Iranian-American Harvard scholar

Adelkhah’s arrest comes as Tehran seeks leverage with France, the UK and Germany — the European signatories to the 2015 agreement, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) — to mitigate the effects of crippling US economic sanctions reimposed since the US withdrew from the deal.

Iran has a track record of jailing dual nationals to use as bargaining chips. They include the Iranian-American Siamak Namazi, the British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, and the Swedish-Iranian Dr. Ahmad Reza Jalali.

“For Tehran, holding hostages is a political and ideological exercise, and a form of leverage against other countries,” the Iranian-American Harvard scholar Dr. Majid Rafizadeh told Arab News.

“This pattern has continued for almost four decades. Iran’s hostage-taking is systematic, and a core pillar of its rogue foreign policy. Tehran holds foreign hostages as pawns to extract economic concessions and obtain geopolitical and financial gains.”

Sciences Po, the elite school where Abdelkhah works, confirmed her arrest but refused to comment.

Iran's state-run IRNA news agency quoted government spokesman Ali Rabiei on Sunday acknowledging a dual national had been arrested, without elaborating.

Adelkhah is best known for her book "Being Modern in Iran," about changes in Iran after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

(With AFP)

 


Family backs Tlaib’s decision not to visit Israel

Updated 18 August 2019

Family backs Tlaib’s decision not to visit Israel

  • Israel said a humanitarian travel request by Tlaib would be considered as long as she promised not to promote a boycott against Israel

RAMALLAH: Relatives of a US congresswoman say they support her decision to decline Israel’s offer allowing her to visit them in the West Bank because the “right to travel should be provided to all without any conditions.”

Rashida Tlaib said she would not see her family, even after Israel lifted a ban on her entry, because the government had imposed restrictions on her trip.

“We totally understand her position and support her in her efforts. The right to travel should be provided to all without any conditions,” her uncle Bassam Tlaib told Arab News.

He was speaking from the family home in Beit Ur Al-Fuka, which is 3 km from the West Bank city of Ramallah, and was flanked by his elderly mother.

He said his niece had visited them many times in the past, but there had never been any conditions attached to her travel.

“She said we will meet when she can come without conditions,” Tlaib said. “One idea has been floated of flying the grandmother to the US or finding a way to have the two meetings in a third country. You know my mother is nearing 90 and it is not easy for her to travel but we are checking out all options.”

Tlaib, a Democrat, has criticized Israel’s policy toward Palestinians and had planned to make an official visit to the country.

Israel said a humanitarian travel request by Tlaib would be considered as long as she promised not to promote a boycott against Israel, local media reported.

But the congresswoman, who is Palestinian-American, lashed out on social media.

“I can’t allow the State of Israel to take away that light by humiliating me & use my love for my sity to bow down to their oppressive & racist policies,” she tweeted, using the word sity to refer to her grandmother. “Silencing me & treating me like a criminal is not what she wants for me. It would kill a piece of me. I have decided that visiting my grandmother under these oppressive conditions stands against everything I believe in — fighting against racism, oppression & injustice.”

The NGO hosting and organizing the trip, Miftah, has been criticized by supporters of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government.

Hanan Ashrawi, the NGO’s founder, said her staff had organized other congressional trips. “This was the third trip we have organized, and we try to do our work professionally and seriously,” Ashrawi told Arab News. “Our very mission is to promote global dialogue and democracy.”

Ashrawi said the attacks on Miftah were unwarranted.  “Miftah has been targeted with the expressed goal of trying to discredit us even though our record is clear. We believe that they are trying to keep organizing congressional delegations within the AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee) monopoly, while we are trying to provide visitors with an opportunity to learn about Palestinian life under occupation and to understand the Palestinian narrative by providing opportunities for delegations to see and engage with Palestinians of all walks of life.” 

Ashrawi said Miftah had been “vetted” by the US Congress’ ethics committee. “We might not be able to bring hundreds of congress people like AIPAC, but we can bring a few and have them see, hear and interact with Palestinians.”

US President Donald Trump had called on Israel not to allow Tlaib and fellow congresswoman Ilhan Omar into Israel as admitting the two “would show great weakness.”

He tweeted that the pair “hate Israel and all Jewish people, and there is nothing that can be said or done to change their minds. Minnesota and Michigan will have a hard time putting them back in office. They are a disgrace.”