UN envoy for Yemen ‘very concerned’ about Houthi attacks on Saudi Arabia

The UN special envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths expressed grave concern about Houthi attacks on Saudi Arabia. (UN/AFP)
Updated 19 July 2019

UN envoy for Yemen ‘very concerned’ about Houthi attacks on Saudi Arabia

  • Griffiths also expressed shock at Houthi authorities sentencing thirty prisoners to death recently
  • The UN envoy called on the Houthis to respect laws concerning prisoners and detainees

LONDON: The UN special envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths said on Thursday that he is “very concerned” about Houthi attacks on Saudi Arabia.

Speaking at the UN, Griffiths also expressed shock at Houthi authorities sentencing thirty prisoners to death recently.   

Thirty men were sentenced to death by the Houthis in Yemen last week amid credible allegations that many were tortured during three years of politically-motivated detention, the UN human rights office said. 

The UN envoy called on the Houthis to respect laws concerning prisoners and detainees. 

Griffiths said he held a "productive meeting" with Saudi Arabia's deputy defense minister Prince Khalid bin Salman on Monday in Jeddah.

Tweeting about the meeting, Griffiths said he discussed with Prince Khalid how to keep Yemen out of ongoing regional tensions and how to make progress in the implementation of the Stockholm agreement with the support of the Kingdom.

 

 


Sudan flood death toll reaches 62: state media

Updated 25 August 2019

Sudan flood death toll reaches 62: state media

  • Sudan has been hit by torrential rains since the start of July
  • Nearly 200,000 people in at least 15 states across the country have been affected

KHARTOUM: Heavy rainfall and flash floods have killed 62 people in Sudan and left 98 others injured, the official SUNA news agency reported on Sunday.
Sudan has been hit by torrential rains since the start of July, affecting nearly 200,000 people in at least 15 states across the country including the capital Khartoum.
The worst affected area is the White Nile state in the south.
Flooding of the Nile river remains "the biggest problem", SUNA said, citing a health ministry official.
On Friday the United Nations said 54 people had died due to the heavy rains.
It said more than 37,000 homes had been destroyed or damaged, quoting figures from the government body it partners with in the crisis response.
"Humanitarians are concerned by the high likelihood of more flash floods," the UN said, adding that the rainy season was expected to last until October.
The floods are having a lasting humanitarian impact on communities, with cut roads, damaged water points, lost livestock and the spread of water-borne diseases by insects.
The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said an extra $150 million were needed from donors to respond to surging waters, in addition to the $1.1 billion required for the overall humanitarian situation in Sudan.