What We Are Reading Today: Bottle of Lies by Katherine Eban

Updated 19 July 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Bottle of Lies by Katherine Eban

  • She lectures frequently on the topic of pharmaceutical integrity

Katherine Eban, the author of Bottle of Lies, is an investigative reporter focusing on the pharmaceutical industry for many years.

She lectures frequently on the topic of pharmaceutical integrity.

In a review for The New York Times, critic David Dobbs said Bottle of Lies “is an invaluable exposé, a reportorial tour de force and a well-turned epic.”

A review in goodreads.com said Bottle of Lies “takes us into a world where generic drugs are designed and manufactured.”

“A decade-long investigation with international sweep, high-stakes brinkmanship and big money at its core, Bottle of Lies reveals how the world’s greatest public-health innovation has become one of its most astonishing swindles,” it added.

The review said Bottle of Lies “exposes the deceit behind generic-drug manufacturing— and the attendant risks for global health. Drawing on exclusive accounts from whistleblowers and regulators, as well as thousands of pages of confidential documents, Eban reveals an industry where fraud is rampant.”


What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

Updated 17 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

  • It mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions

Democracy establishes relationships of political equality, ones in which citizens equally share authority over what they do together and respect one another as equals. 

But in today’s divided public square, democracy is challenged by political thinkers who disagree about how democratic institutions should be organized, and by antidemocratic politicians who exploit uncertainties about what democracy requires and why it matters. 

Democratic Equality mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions, showing how equality of authority is essential to relating equally as citizens, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

James Lindley Wilson explains why the US Senate and Electoral College are urgently in need of reform, why proportional representation is not a universal requirement of democracy, how to identify racial vote dilution and gerrymandering in electoral districting, how to respond to threats to democracy posed by wealth inequality, and how judicial review could be more compatible with the democratic ideal.