Seesaws let kids on each side of US-Mexico border play together

A Mexican soldier walks in front of American and Mexican families playing with a toy called ‘up and down’ (Seesaw swing) over the Mexican border with the US at the Anapra zone in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua State, Mexico. (AFP)
Updated 30 July 2019

Seesaws let kids on each side of US-Mexico border play together

  • Three pink seesaws were unveiled at a border fence separating Sunland Park, in New Mexico, and Ciudad Juarez, in Mexico, allowing kids and adults on either side to play together
  • Video and pictures of the seesaws were trending on social media, with many praising the idea that comes as Donald Trump’s administration pushes ahead with tightened immigration policies

LOS ANGELES: Two California professors have installed seesaws across the US-Mexico border in a blunt rebuke to President Donald Trump over his plans to build a wall along the 2,000-mile boundary between the two countries.
The three pink seesaws were unveiled on Monday at a border fence separating Sunland Park, in New Mexico, and Ciudad Juarez, in Mexico, allowing kids and adults on either side to play together.
Ronald Rael, a professor of architecture at the University of California Berkeley who came up with the project with Virginia San Fratello, a professor of design at San Jose University, said the idea for “Teetertotter Wall” had been in the making for a decade.
He said seeing the project come to life was “one of the most incredible experiences” for him and Fratello, describing the event at the border as “filled with joy, excitement, and togetherness.”

“The wall became a literal fulcrum for US-Mexico relations and children and adults were connected in meaningful ways on both sides with the recognition that the actions that take place on one side have a direct consequence on the other side,” he added.
Video and pictures of the seesaws were trending on social media Tuesday, with many praising the idea that comes as US President Donald Trump’s administration pushes ahead with tightened immigration policies.
“Beautiful reminder that we are connected: what happens on one side impacts the other,” tweeted Mexican actor Mauricio Martinez.
“The symbolism of the seesaw is just magical,” said Claudia Tristan, director of Latinx messaging for El Paso, Texas-born presidential contender Beto O’Rourke.
“#Border fence will not keep us from our neighbors.”

 


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.