Classy, classic kaftans are what Hoor Bahamdein does best

Hoor Bahamdein launched her eponymous brand in 2012. (Supplied)
Updated 05 August 2019

Classy, classic kaftans are what Hoor Bahamdein does best

LONDON: Jeddah-based fashion designer Hoor Bahamdein is not one to follow fads and trends — instead, she has mastered the art of creating elegant jalabeyas and she’s doing everything she can to prove that classic style trumps all.

She launched her eponymous brand in 2012 and now sells in bazaars and pop-ups across the country, as well as through her Instagram account, @hoorbahamdein, where fashion lovers can browse through her classic kaftans.

“Classic is classic,” Bahamdein told Arab News, “it’s never going to be a passing trend. I believe every person must have a classic piece in their closet. So classic, for me, is important… my brand is simplicity with a touch of luxury.”




Hoor Bahamdein is known for her classic designs. (Supplied) 

The designer is careful about the fabrics she chooses and focuses heavily on texture, comfort and adding the element of luxury.

Her go-to fabrics are “pure silk, taffeta and cotton because these fabrics allow the designs to be a perfect shape,” she said.

 “When women wear my designs, they feel feminine. Also, what is important is that my individuality is evident in each of my creations. It makes me happy when people notice my designs and appreciate my pieces,” the designed noted, adding that she seeks to create pieces for “the strong and feminine woman who knows what she wants.”




Hoor Bahamdein has mastered the art of creating elegant jalabeyas. (Supplied) 

Earlier this summer, Bahamdein released an elegant seasonal collection inspired by the traditional clothes of women in Hadramout, a governate of Yemen.

 “I took my inspiration from Hadramout where, in their culture, women wear the thobe in a Hadhrami way. I mixed this culture with something from my own designs for a unique look,” Bahamdein said.

The rising designer also has a message for young Saudi women who wish to pursue a career in fashion design.

“First of all, she needs to believe in herself and love what she does,” she said.


Startup of the Week: Saudi baker and chef winning hearts of food lovers

Photo supplied
Updated 20 August 2019

Startup of the Week: Saudi baker and chef winning hearts of food lovers

  • Working over 15 hours a day and being self-taught was just the start; Essam is the interior and graphic designer, the marketer, the CEO and the chef at White Mountain

A Saudi bakery and restaurant business specializing in pastries is finding its way into Saudi hearts with a delectable selection of fine Italian, French, and Swiss foods.
Ahmad Essam, 28, a self-taught baker and chef, left a productive family business to create what is now one of the most prestigious bakeries in Alkhobar.
Essam set up his bakery and restaurant while working as a production engineer, selling tarts and cakes to his friends.
He was overwhelmed by the encouragement he received, and little by little Essam, his dream of running his own company emerged.
Working over 15 hours a day and being self-taught was just the start; Essam is the interior and graphic designer, the marketer, the CEO and the chef at White Mountain.
Baking French pastries such as croissants, macarons, mille-feuille, eclairs and tarts require a true artisan. Essam described the glory he feels when he bakes, saying: “Dealing with precise tips to get the real essence of French pastries and reaching a level to bake without recipes is a matter of experience and good knowledge. Being a real baker requires a lot of learning as it’s not only about mixing water and flour; its trick lies behind the process of fermentation that sometimes lasts for days.’’
Every once in a while, the young man distributes membership books to loyal customers. “On Valentine’s Day, we distributed 3,000 roses,” he added.
Essam is very passionate, and dreams of opening a cooking academy in Saudi Arabia so he can inspire other amateur bakers; he told Arab News about his future 12,000-square-meters cooking village project that he is aiming to create in Riyadh, “including a library that collects all cookbooks, a seasonal spice shop, a great lake garden, a pizzeria, glossary shop and more, all of which falls under one theme: Cooking.”
For him, business is an obsession and profession. “Chefs have their egos. They are dealing with a tricky job and they know what they are doing exactly. They do not accept comments or advice from other chefs,” he explained.
You can follow him for more information on White Mountain on Instagram: @wm.bakery.