Norway mosque suspect rejects murder allegation

Police said they are considering adding a charge of “attempted act of terror.” (File/AFP)
Updated 12 August 2019

Norway mosque suspect rejects murder allegation

  • The attacker is 21 years old
  • He is suspected of murdering his 17 year old stepsister

OSLO: A Norwegian man suspected of killing his stepsister and opening fire at a mosque near Oslo rejects allegations of murder and attempted murder, his lawyer said Monday.

The man, identified by media as 21-year old Philip Manshaus, is suspected of murder in the death of his 17-year-old stepsister and attempted murder at the Al-Noor mosque on Saturday.

But police are considering adding a charge of “attempted act of terror.”

“I can confirm” he rejects the allegations, his lawyer Unni Fries told AFP.

The suspect is due to appear before a judge at one p.m. (1100 GMT) for a detention hearing. Police have called for it to take place behind closed doors.

The suspect entered the mosque in the affluent Oslo suburb of Baerum armed with at least two weapons and opened fire before being overpowered by a 65-year-old man who suffered minor injuries.

Hours after the attack, the body of a young woman was found in a home in Baerum and police on Sunday confirmed that it was the suspect’s 17-year-old stepsister.

According to local media, she was of Chinese origin and had been adopted by the companion of the suspect’s father.

Oslo’s acting chief of the police operation Rune Skjold said Sunday the investigation showed that the suspect appeared to hold “far-right” and “anti-immigrant” views.


S.Korea official says US-N.Korea dialogue seen starting soon

Updated 49 min 11 sec ago

S.Korea official says US-N.Korea dialogue seen starting soon

  • South Korea will hold a meeting with Japan to discuss intelligence-sharing pact
  • The agreement will expire on August 24

SEOUL: The United States and North Korea are expected to reopen denuclearization talks soon and it would “go well,” a senior South Korean official said on Thursday, boosting hopes for progress in negotiations after a prolonged stalemate.
South Korea’s deputy national security adviser Kim Hyun-chong gave his upbeat assessment after meeting with US envoy for North Korea Stephen Biegun in Seoul.
“My impression was that North Korea and the United States would carry out dialogue soon, and it would go well,” Kim told reporters after the one-hour meeting, without elaborating.
Working-level talks between the United States and North Korea have yet to restart since they were stalled by the failed second summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi in February.
Trump and Kim met again in June at the inter-Korean border and agreed to reopen negotiations.
The South Korean official also said that South Korea’s presidential National Security Council will convene later on Thursday to review an intelligence-sharing pact with Japan, that Seoul had threatened to scrap amid a spiralling diplomatic and trade spat.
The General Security of Military Information Agreement (GSOMIA) could expire on Saturday if either side decides not to roll it over.
According to Kim, the South Korean official, Biegun raised the issue, which has worried Washington as the accord is instrumental in three-way efforts to counter North Korea’s nuclear and missile threats.
“I’ve told him we’ll carefully examine it and make a decision in a way that serves our national interest,” the South Korean deputy national security adviser said.