K-pop band BTS take break before Saudi show

Fans are being asked to leave these boys alone while they’re on holiday. (AFP)
Updated 12 August 2019

K-pop band BTS take break before Saudi show

  • The band’s website says they will perform in Riyadh on Oct. 11
  • They scored three No. 1 albums on the Billboard in less than a year

SEOUL: South Korean boy band BTS will take their first long holiday in six years after a series of global hits, their managers said, asking fans to respect the band's privacy if they see them in “a chance encounter.”

The seven members will take their first extended vacation since the band's debut in 2013, managers at Big Hit Entertainment said on Sunday. They did not say how long BTS will be on holiday, but the band's website said their next world tour concert is in Riyadh on Oct. 11.

“This period of rest will be an opportunity for the members of BTS, who have relentless(ly) driven themselves toward their goal since their debut, to recharge and prepare to present themselves anew as musicians and creators,” Big Hit said.

“Should you have a chance encounter with a member of BTS while they are on vacation, we ask that you show consideration for their need to rest and enjoy their private time off.” 

“BTS will return refreshed and recharged to return all the love you have and continue to show them,” it added.

The band crowned their global reach with three No. 1 albums on the Billboard chart in less than a year, a 2019 Grammy nomination and concerts from Los Angeles to Paris. BTS broke into the U.S. market in 2017, the first Korean group to win a Billboard music award.


What We Are Reading Today: All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung

Updated 22 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung

  • From early childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth

What does it mean to lose your roots — within your culture, within your family— and what happens when you find them?

All You Can Ever Know is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets — vital reading for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong, according to a review published on goodreads.com

Nicole Chung was born severely premature, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town.

From early childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth.

She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hopes of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was simply her fate as a transracial adoptee. But as she grew up — facing prejudice her adoptive family could not see, finding her identity as an Asian American and a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from — she wondered if the story she had been told was the whole truth.

With warmth, candor, and startling insight, Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child.