Saudi ‘White Vests’ set out to help pilgrims

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Video grab of White Vests volunteers in action.
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Video grab of White Vests volunteers in action.
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Video grab of White Vests volunteers in action.
Updated 12 August 2019

Saudi ‘White Vests’ set out to help pilgrims

  •  "White Vests" is an umbrella organization of volunteer groups, organized by the Saudi Ministry of Labor and Social Development

JEDDAH: A Saudi youth tradition of volunteering to help Hajj pilgrims complete their journey has been strengthened this year through a special government initiative. 

The White Vests, an umbrella group covering a range of volunteering sectors, was organized by the Saudi Ministry of Labor and Social Development.

Many volunteer groups play a crucial role in helping pilgrims, offering medical assistance, safety advice and general guidance.

The Saudi Arabian Boy Scouts Association joined forces with the White Vests this year, complementing the efforts of government entities involved in Hajj season, such as the Ministry of Hajj and Umrah, the Ministry of Health and the Muslim World League. 

The Twitter account @SaudiNVG has gained over 20,000 followers since joining the platform in January with a message for volunteers from around the Kingdom. 

In a video posted by @SaudiNVG, orthopaedic surgeon and consultant Dr. Mohammed Abu-Nawas, a White Vests Hajj volunteer, said: “In Makkah, we are all servants to the guests of Allah, and we learn from them, and communicate with them with the right Islamic way of thinking. And we build with them a cultural bridge through technology.”

Boy scout Essam Al-Shaman, 20, a student at the University of Tabuk, has been a Hajj volunteer for seven years. 

“I volunteered for the Ministry of Education for five years, and this is my second year volunteering with the university,” he told Arab News.

“I enjoy volunteering because of all the kind prayers I receive from pilgrims. It is a humanitarian service. I would like to pursue what I grew up doing and I hope to reach the level of scout commander — and hopefully I will continue to volunteer to help pilgrims every year,” he said.

 

 

 


Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

Updated 19 August 2019

Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

  • One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020
  • A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia is to set up arts academies, including two in the next two years, offering a step toward academic qualification and enlarging the Kingdom’s footprint in heritage, arts and crafts, and music.

The initiative is part of the Ministry of Culture’s Quality of Life program. 

The minister, Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Farhan, said investment in “capacity building” was one of the most important elements in encouraging the cultural sector, which enjoyed unlimited support from King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The Kingdom was rich in diverse arts, talents and artistic production, Prince Badr said, and the academies would be a first step toward academic qualification in the arts within the Kingdom.

One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020, targeting 1,000 students and trainees in long- and short-term programs. 

A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021.

The music academy in particular will be “the core of music production and talent development in Saudi Arabia,” Saudi musician, composer and producer Mamdouh Saif told Arab News.

The music industry was a large and diverse field, Saif said, and education was crucial. 

“The academy is the right place to launch the music industry in Saudi Arabia, and it will have a significant impact on Saudi youth, and young people in surrounding countries,” he said.

He expects “a very high turnout” for the academy among young Saudis. 

“Due to my expertise in this area, I receive many questions from people who want to learn music, but through private lessons,” he said.

“But the availability of an academy for this purpose, that teaches music in a methodological way, will be the right start for those interested in music.”