FBI seeking to question alleged Al-Qaeda operative in Brazil

The FBI added Mohamed Ahmed Elsayed Ahmed Ibrahim to its Most Wanted list on Monday. (FBI)
Updated 13 August 2019

FBI seeking to question alleged Al-Qaeda operative in Brazil

  • The FBI says Mohamed Ahmed Elsayed Ahmed Ibrahim to its Most Wanted list
  • Brazil’s ministries of justice and foreign affairs said the Egyptian had entered Brazil in 2018

RIO DE JANEIRO: The US Federal Bureau of Investigation is seeking to question an alleged Egyptian Al-Qaeda operative believed to be living in Brazil, and the South American country has pledged to cooperate with the United States in any way it can.
The FBI added Mohamed Ahmed Elsayed Ahmed Ibrahim to its Most Wanted list on Monday, saying he was being sought “for questioning in connection with his alleged role as an Al-Qaeda operative and facilitator who has allegedly been involved in plotting attacks against the United States and its interests.”
The FBI said he had been “providing material support” since about 2013 for Al-Qaeda, the group behind the Sept. 11 attacks in New York in 2001. It said he was born in Egypt in 1977 and is currently living in Brazil.
In a joint statement on Monday, Brazil’s ministries of justice and foreign affairs said the Egyptian had entered Brazil in 2018 and was a legal resident in the country.
“The Brazilian government is open to cooperating with US authorities on its request, in accordance with our law, and is following the case,” the statement said.
Brazil’s far-right President Jair Bolsonaro is working to forge closer ties with US President Donald Trump, an ideological ally who has proposed a bilateral trade pact between the two largest economies in the Americas.
Security cooperation between the two countries has long been strong, with US and Brazilian officials working closely together on drug and weapons smuggling cases. The United States has long been concerned by suspected militants from organizations such as Hezbollah who live and operate in Brazil.


Thai official dismisses Muslim insurgent demand on detainees

Updated 19 August 2019

Thai official dismisses Muslim insurgent demand on detainees

  • Officials of the Barisan Revolusi Nasional met a Thai delegation and demanded the release of detainees
  • The insurgency in the Malay-speaking region of the predominantly Buddhist country has killed some 7,000 people over the past 15 years

BANGKOK: A Thai deputy prime minister dismissed on Monday a demand made by a Malay Muslim group to free those detained over alleged links to the long-running insurgency in Thailand’s mainly Muslim south as a pre-condition for formal talks.
Officials of the Barisan Revolusi Nasional (BRN) met a Thai delegation at an undisclosed location in Southeast Asia on Friday and demanded the release of detainees, a leader of the group told Reuters in a rare interview.
The insurgency in the Malay-speaking region of the predominantly Buddhist country has killed some 7,000 people over the past 15 years and has flared on and off for decades.
“How can you say that? Everything must follow the justice procedure,” Thai Deputy Prime Minister Prawit Wongsuwan told reporters on Monday when he was asked about the BRN’s demand.
The BRN also demanded that the Thai government conduct a transparent investigation into alleged abuses by security forces after allegations that a man from the south, Abdullah Isamusa, 32, fell into a coma after being interrogated by the military.
The army said authorities were investigating and that there was no proof so far of torture.
The BRN, the most active insurgent group in the south, has opted to stay out of peace talks between the Thai government and other insurgent groups, although it said it held two previous meetings in recent years.
Yala, Pattani, and Narathiwat provinces were part of an independent Malay Muslim sultanate before Thailand annexed them in 1909.