What We Are Reading Today: The Perfect Weapon by David Sanger

Updated 14 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Perfect Weapon by David Sanger

  • This is a nice summary of the current situation around cyberwar from an American perspective

The Perfect Weapon consists largely of the retelling of cyberattack incidents that have previously been in the news over the past ten years. 

According to Paul Pillar’s review in the Times, David Sanger’s book is “an encyclopedic account of policy-relevant happenings in the cyberworld (that) stays firmly grounded in real events.”

A review in goodreads.com said the book offers “a stunning and incisive look into how cyber warfare is influencing elections, threatening national security, and bringing us to the brink of global war.”

Reported and written with unprecedented access by New York Times chief Washington correspondent and bestselling author Sanger, The Perfect Weapon takes readers inside war rooms and boardrooms to give the deep-background story of the increasingly pitched battle between nations, their governments, their cyber warriors, and their corporations.

“This is a nice summary of the current situation around cyberwar from an American perspective. This is a scary world where large state players are increasingly intruding US targets,” said  the review.


What We Are Reading Today: Conscience by Patricia S. Churchland

Updated 26 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Conscience by Patricia S. Churchland

  • Churchland brings together an understanding of the influences of nature and nurture

In her brilliant work Touching a Nerve, Patricia S. Churchland, the distinguished founder of neurophilosophy, drew from scientific research on the brain to understand its philosophical and ethical implications for identity, consciousness, free will, and memory, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

In Conscience, she explores how moral systems arise from our physical selves in combination with environmental demands.

All social groups have ideals for behavior, even though ethics vary among different cultures and among individuals within each culture. In trying to understand why, Churchland brings together an understanding of the influences of nature and nurture. 

She shows how children grow up in society to learn, through repetition and rewards, the norms, values, and behavior that their parents embrace.

Conscience delves into scientific studies, particularly the fascinating work on twins, to deepen our understanding of whether people have a predisposition to embrace specific ethical stands.