Freed Bergdahl may face investigation

Updated 03 June 2014
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Freed Bergdahl may face investigation

WASHINGTON: Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, recently released after five years as a captive of the Taleban, may still be disciplined if the army finds evidence of misconduct, the US military’s top officer said Tuesday.
Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was speaking after claims from members of Bergdahl’s unit that he had been captured after abandoning his post.
The New York Times cited a former military official as saying Bergdahl slipped away from his base near the Afghan border with Pakistan, leaving a note saying he had become disillusioned with the army and the war and was going to start a new life.
“Our army’s leaders will not look away from misconduct if it occurred,” Dempsey said.
The general stressed that Bergdahl, who was taken as a private and promoted while in captivity, was innocent until proven guilty, and that the military would continue to care for him and his family.
“The questions about this particular soldier’s conduct are separate from our effort to recover ANY US service member in enemy captivity,” Dempsey wrote in his statement. “This was likely the last, best opportunity to free him. As for the circumstances of his capture, when he is able to provide them, we’ll learn the facts.”




Bergdahl was released over the weekend in Afghanistan in a prisoner exchange for five high-level Taleban militants who had been held at the US prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
President Barack Obama has come under fire from Republicans and other critics who say the swap will encourage others to try to take American soldiers or diplomats hostage.
Obama’s aides have defended the deal as an appropriate attempt to save the life of a captured soldier’s whose health was believed to be deteriorating.


India flood death toll shoots up to 324

Updated 17 August 2018
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India flood death toll shoots up to 324

  • More than 10,000 kilometers of roads and hundreds of homes have been destroyed or damaged across the state
  • A heavy rainfall ‘red-alert’ has been issued across much of the state, which is home to around 33 million people

KOCHI, India: More than 300 people have been killed in the Indian state of Kerala by the worst flooding to hit the region in a century, authorities said Friday, as troop reinforcements stepped up rescue efforts.
The state — a key international tourist draw with its tropical mountains and beaches — has been battered by record monsoon rainfall in recent days and is “facing the worst flood in 100 years,” chief minister Pinarayi Vijayan said.
In a Twitter statement released by his office, he said there had been “324 lives lost,” a tripling of the death toll in the last 24 hours.


Vijayan added that 223,139 people have been moved to more than 1,500 relief camps.
With thousands still trapped, power and communication lines down and fresh alerts of further torrential rain, authorities warned of even more trouble ahead.
More than 30 military helicopters and 320 boats are attempting rescues across Kerala.

Extra troops have been sent in and local fishermen have also joined the operation with their boats.
People all over the state of 33 million people have made panic-stricken appeals on social media for help, saying they cannot get through to rescue services.
India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi was set to arrive in the stricken state on Friday night.