Focus remains on tracking technology

Updated 03 June 2016
0

Focus remains on tracking technology

DUBLIN: Global airlines expect to agree by year end the best way of ensuring faster recovery of data from the flight recorders which might help shed light on disasters such as the disappearance of EgyptAir MS804.
Aircraft tracking was already a priority since the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines MH370 in 2014 and the UN’s aviation agency ICAO said in March new aircraft needed to be equipped with improved means to have their black boxes recovered, or data from them made available in a timely manner, by 2021.
Gilberto Lopez Meyer, senior vice president for safety and flight operations at the International Air Transport Association (IATA), said the organization would by the end of year state its view on which of various possible techniques would be best.
“I believe that by the end of this year we should have a concrete and definite position on this issue,” he said.
“IATA is in discussions. Every single option has pros and cons.”
Black boxes could either stream their data live or be fitted with a deployable beacon, or automatic deployable flight recorder, to make them quicker to find.
One concern related to a beacon system is accidental deployment, while a data streaming system would create huge amounts of data for all aircraft.
Under standards brought in by ICAO, aircraft will by 2018 have to carry devices which can transmit their location at least once a minute in cases of distress.


Saudi Aramco discussing investments in India’s Reliance Industries

Updated 20 February 2019
0

Saudi Aramco discussing investments in India’s Reliance Industries

  • World's biggest oil company targets petrochemicals
  • India is a top investment priority for Saudi Arabia

NEW DELHI: Saudi Aramco’s CEO Amin Nassar said on Wednesday that the company is in talks with India’s Reliance Industries for possible investments and is seeking other opportunities in the country.
Saudi Aramco signed an agreement in April with a consortium of state-owned Indian refiners to participate in a $44 billion refinery project on the country’s west coast.
“We are looking at additional investment in India so we are in discussions with other companies as well, including Reliance and others,” Nasser said in a panel discussion in New Delhi.
“We are looking at it. We are not limited to that investment which is the mega refinery,” Nasser said, referring to the west coast project, which would process 1.2 million bpd of crude and produce 18 million tons per year of petrochemicals.
Nasser is part of the entourage traveling with Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who is in India for a one-day visit.
Reliance Industries, controlled by Asia’s richest man Mukesh Ambani, is India’s biggest refining and petrochemicals company and runs a 1.4 million barrels per day (bpd) refinery in western India. It plans to expand the capacity to 2 million bpd by 2030, according to plans shared with the Indian government.
Saudi Arabia, the world’s biggest crude oil exporter, is keen to expand further into oil refining and petrochemicals.
India would provide a fast growing market for oil and fuels and is already a steady buyer of Saudi oil.
“India is an investment priority for Saudi Aramco. India takes from us almost 800,000 barrels a day and by 2040 India’s total consumption will be around 8.2 million barrels per day,” Nasser said.
India is currently world’s third-biggest crude oil consumer with demand of 4.7 million bpd, according to government figures.
However, Aramco is already facing delays for the refinery project, planned for the western state of Maharashtra, as thousands of farmers have refused to surrender land for it.
Reuters reported on Tuesday the Maharashtra government is looking to move the refinery location.
Yousef Al-Benyan, the chief executive officer for SABIC, the Saudi Arabia-based petrochemical company that is the fourth largest in the world, was also on the panel. He said SABIC wants to expand its business and presence in India.