Heavy reader? Here’s 35-kg book

Courtesy photo.
Updated 10 June 2016
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Heavy reader? Here’s 35-kg book

SOMERSET WEST, South Africa: Heavy reader? Maybe this South African rugby book weighing 35 kg and measuring half a meter by half a meter is for you. Got a spare $13,500, though?
There are just 100 leather-bound Captains’ Editions of the recently released “Springbok Opus,” which tells the complete story of South Africa and its national sport dating to the 1860s, said Craig Mark, the sales and marketing director for the book.
Its 630 pages and more than 150,000 words long, took four years to put together, and the books are autographed by 45 current and former star players.
The Springbok Opus is the latest in a line of collectable sports books aimed at the really, really dedicated fan. This one’s the first in rugby, and there have been others on the Super Bowl, Formula One, Ferrari, and Manchester United.
The South African rugby book may turn out to be a bargain. Versions of the Ferrari F1 team opus, with covers encrusted with diamonds, went on sale at $275,000.


Floods force millions to flee homes in South Asia

A man looks out of the window of his partially submerged home in flood-hit Kahchin, Myanmar. (Reuters)
Updated 1 min 43 sec ago
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Floods force millions to flee homes in South Asia

  • Death toll in Nepal and Bangladesh rises to 76 after days of heavy rains

KATMANDU: Floods have forced more than 3 million people from their homes across north and northeastern India, officials said on Monday, as the death toll in neighboring Nepal and low-lying Bangladesh rose to 76 after days of heavy monsoon rains.

Worst affected is the northern Indian state of Bihar, where some 1.9 million people have fled their homes due to rising waters, a state government release said.
Television channels showed roads and railway lines in Bihar submerged, with people wading through chest-high, brown, churning waters, carrying their belongings on their heads.
An impoverished agrarian province with rickety infrastructure and poor health care services, Bihar has a history of flooding in its northern areas that border Nepal.
Flood waters in the northeastern Indian state of Assam rose overnight with the Brahmaputra River, which flows down from the Himalayas into Bangladesh, and its tributaries still in spate. More than 1.7 million people in Assam have been displaced by the floods, authorities said, and most of the Kaziranga National Park, home to the rare one-horned rhino, was also under water.
“The flood situation has turned very critical with 31 of the 32 districts affected,” said Assam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal said.
“We are working on a war footing to deal with the flood situation.”
Known for its tea industry, Assam is often inundated by seasonal flooding, and state and federal governments have spent millions of rupees on flood control.
India’s weather office on Monday forecast widespread rains across Assam and Bihar for the next two days.
In neighboring Nepal, 64 people were killed and 31 were missing, with around a third of all districts hit by heavy rains, authorities said. Many of the deaths were caused by landslides that swept away houses.

We are working on a war footing to deal with the flood situation.

                Sarbananda Sonowal, Chief minister of Assam

In southeast Nepal, water levels on the Kosi River, which flows into Bihar, had receded, an district official said. In 2008, the Kosi broke its banks and changed course, inundating huge tracts of land and killing 500 people.
“Our analysis is that the danger is over now that the water level has come down,” Chiranjibi Giri, assistant district administrator of Sunsari district, told Reuters.
The annual monsoon season, which brings the most rain across south Asia, also hit Bangladesh hard, forcing an estimated 190,000 people out of their homes, government officials said.
In Cox’s Bazar district, shelter to some 700,000 Rohingya refugees who fled violence in neighboring Myanmar, more than 100,000 people have been displaced.
Since early July, flooding and landslides have damaged thousands of shelters at the refugee camps, killing two people, including a child, Human Rights Watch said in a release last week.