Feelgood green film is huge hit in France

Melanie Laurent ... message of hope
Updated 15 June 2016
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Feelgood green film is huge hit in France

PARIS: When the French actress Melanie Laurent read a now famous 2012 paper by leading scientists warning that the Earth’s climate was reaching a tipping point from which it may never recover, she sat down and wept.
“I was pregnant, and I was so shocked I spent the whole day crying,” she said, wondering what kind of world she was bringing her child into.
But instead of succumbing to fatalism, Laurent — best known for her role in Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds” — went looking for the positive.
With study after study confirming the dire warnings by experts about the state of the biosphere, Laurent and her friend Cyril Dion felt people needed hope.
“Demain” (Tomorrow), their feelgood film about how the world can change for the better — and the inspirational farm, energy and educational pioneers who are pointing the way — has had cinema audiences on their feet.
More than a million people have so far flocked to see it in France alone, where it won the Cesar — or “French Oscar” — for the best documentary of the year.
The film shows how new French peramculture techniques can make small organic microfarms 10 times more productive than industrial farming — and all without the aid of a single piece of petrol-driven machinery.
It highlights how major cities like San Francisco are recycling and composting 80 percent of domestic waste — and making money from it — while Copenhagen aims to run on renewable energy alone within less than a decade.
Dion, an environmentalist, said he was overawed by the enthusiasm that has greeted the crowd-funded film in France, Belgium and Switzerland, receiving standing ovations wherever it showed.
“People say that it has given them back hope and enthusiasm to do lots of things... that things can be done,” he said.


Canada acquires rare book previously owned by Adolf Hitler

Updated 24 January 2019
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Canada acquires rare book previously owned by Adolf Hitler

  • The book details certain cities' population statistics along with organizations and media outlets key at the time to North America's Jewish communities
  • The bookplate bears an eagle, and swastika, and the words "Ex Libris Adolf Hitler," indicating it was part of his personal library

OTTAWA: Library and Archives Canada announced Wednesday it had acquired a rare 1944 book that once belonged to Adolf Hitler.
Written in German, "Statistics, Media, and Organizations of Jewry in the United States and Canada" is a 137-page report produced in 1944 by Heinz Kloss, a famed German linguist who had contact with US Nazi sympathizers.
The book details certain cities' population statistics along with organizations and media outlets key at the time to North America's Jewish communities, Library and Archives Canada said in a statement.
"This work hints at the story of what might have happened in Canada had the Allies lost World War II. It also demonstrates that the Holocaust was not a purely European event, but rather an operation that was stopped before it reached North America," it added.
The bookplate bears an eagle, and swastika, and the words "Ex Libris Adolf Hitler," indicating it was part of his personal library.
"It is fundamental ... to acquire, preserve and make available documents no matter how controversial or contentious they could be," said Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada.
Hitler was an avid reader with a collection reportedly containing 6,000 to 16,000 titles.
Library and Archives Canada said the book was likely brought back to the US as a souvenir of war, as in spring 1945 American soldiers took thousands of books from the Nazi leader's second home near Berchtesgaden, in the German Alps.
The institution added it acquired the book from a reputable Judaica dealer, who obtained it as part of a collection owned by a Holocaust survivor.