Call grows for universal access to clean energy

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GREEN PUSH: French Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy Minister and COP21 President Segolene Royal, President Francois Hollande and OECD Secretary General Angel Gurria attend a meeting on sustainable energy at the Elysee Presidential Palace in Paris. (AFP)
Updated 17 June 2016
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Call grows for universal access to clean energy

BARCELONA: Only a tiny fraction of climate change funding is going into small-scale solar, biogas and other off-grid systems that may be the best way to get power to the world’s poorest, researchers say.
That problem, evident in new figures from the London-based International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), points to a challenge for the main international organization promoting access to clean energy for everyone on the planet, which this week adopted a strategy to achieve that goal earlier than a 2030 deadline.
Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) head Rachel Kyte said its new five-year plan aimed to help “leaders to go further, faster” by supporting them to make good energy policy, setting up partnerships and unlocking finance.
“This will help us secure an energy transition that is clean, affordable and just, because no one must be left behind,” she said in a statement.
There are still around 1 billion people in the world without access to electricity, and nearly 3 billion who cook using smoky fuels such as wood, kerosene and dung.
The new Sustainable Development Goals, which took effect this year, include a target to ensure universal access to “affordable, reliable and modern energy” by 2030.
Estimates of how much is needed to provide everyone in the world with electric power and clean cooking facilities range from $40 billion to $100 billion per year.
In 2011, the International Energy Agency said $23 billion was required annually for decentralized energy as part of that push, on top of existing funding, the new IIED report noted.
It calculated that, of the $14.1 billion approved by governments in international climate finance between 2003 and 2015, around 40 percent, or $5.6 billion, was earmarked for energy programs, but only 3.5 percent was specifically allocated for decentralized energy projects.
While it did not determine specific figures for wider development aid used to tackle climate change, the IIED said total public climate finance for small-scale, off-grid energy likely amounted to little more than 5 percent of what is needed.
Rita Poppe, an advocacy officer with Hivos, a Netherlands-based development organization that commissioned the report, said more government money should flow into small-scale renewable energy — such as solar home systems, mini-grids and clean cookstoves — because that was the best way to get energy to the poorest quickly.
“They see the (power) lines above their heads, but they are not connected, so you really need a decentralized solution,” she said.
The IIED paper said most public climate finance is going to large-scale energy projects in high and middle-income countries.
IIED researcher Neha Rai said bigger energy projects offered more easily measurable benefits to funders in terms of reducing planet-warming emissions, while the costs of putting smaller schemes in place were higher, a deterrent to investment.
But the paper noted how some countries like Bangladesh and Nepal have set up national agencies that bundle small projects together so they are more attractive and cheaper to fund. The agencies then channel money to the local level.

SOCIAL BENEFITS
Poppe of Hivos said public funding, including grants, would be required to jump-start decentralized clean energy systems in the next decade until the technologies become more established and less of a risky business proposition. That would smooth the way for greater private-sector involvement, she added.
Larger donors should focus more on supporting off-grid energy besides expanding power grids, and measure the benefits of decentralized energy projects in terms of their social impact, not just the amount of emissions avoided, she said.
Social benefits can include improved health, due to things like refrigeration of medicines, as well as enabling children to study more easily, and access to market and weather data for farmers who can charge mobile phones to get that information.
The new SE4All strategy, to be released in full later this month, aims to catalyze action on energy access through both decentralized solutions and grid connections.


Tesla shares fall after CEO Musk abuses British diver

Updated 48 min 22 sec ago
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Tesla shares fall after CEO Musk abuses British diver

  • The billionaire entrepreneur’s spat with British diver Vernon Unsworth started last week, after rescue teams rejected Musk’s offer of a mini-submarine created by his rocket company SpaceX
  • Musk gave no evidence for alleging Unsworth was a pedophile

NEW YORK: Shares of Tesla Inc. fell 2.75 percent on Monday after Chief Executive Elon Musk directed abuse on Twitter at one of the British cave divers involved in the rescue of 12 Thai children last week.
A number of analysts and investors, requesting anonymity, told Reuters that Musk’s comments are adding to their concerns that his public statements are distracting him from Tesla’s main business of producing electric cars. The stock sell-off knocked almost $2 billion off the company’s market value.
Tesla shares closed at $310.10 before rising 1.9 percent in after-hours trading.
James Anderson, a partner at Tesla’s fourth-largest shareholder, asset manager Baillie Gifford, called the weekend’s events “a regrettable instance” and said he had reiterated to the company the need for “peace and execution” of its core business.
The billionaire entrepreneur’s spat with British diver Vernon Unsworth started last week, after rescue teams rejected Musk’s offer of a mini-submarine created by his rocket company SpaceX to help rescue a 12-member soccer team and their coach trapped inside a flooded cave in the northern province of Chiang Rai.
“He can stick his submarine where it hurts,” CNN reported Unsworth as saying. “It just has absolutely no chance of working.”
Musk shot back on Sunday on Twitter: “We will make one (video) of the mini-sub/pod going all the way to Cave 5 no problemo. Sorry pedo guy, you really did ask for it.” The tweet was later deleted.
Tesla spokespeople and lawyers did not respond to emails and phone calls from Reuters requesting comment on Musk’s comments on Twitter.
Musk gave no evidence for alleging Unsworth was a pedophile. Unsworth said he would consider taking legal action against Musk over the remarks, in comments filmed in Chiang Rai on Monday by Australia’s 9News. Reuters could not reach Unsworth for comment.
Unsworth’s wife told Reuters on Monday that her husband was returning to Britain on July 19, where he will speak to lawyers.
Last week, Narongsak Osottanakorn, the leader of the rescue operation in Thailand, rejected Musk’s mini-submarine as not suitable for the task. Musk responded on Twitter on July 10, calling Osottanakorn “not the subject matter expert.”
Musk also regularly uses Twitter to criticize media reports on Tesla, which has struggled to meet its own production targets for its Model 3 sedan, which is seen as key to the company’s profitability.