Sports world pays tribute to victims

People observe a minute of silence for the victims of an attack that left at least 84 people dead in Nice when a man drove a truck through a crowd, in Carhaix-Plouguer, western France, on Friday on the second day of the 25th edition of the Festival des Vieilles Charrues. (AFP)
Updated 16 July 2016
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Sports world pays tribute to victims

PARIS: France Davis Cup captain Yannick Noah, riders at the Tour de France and golfers at the British Open led tributes Friday from the world of sport to the victims of the Nice terror attack.
The Tour’s 13th stage only went ahead amid heightened security after Thursday night’s truck attack on the French Riviera city which killed at least 84 people.
Organizers declared cycling’s blue riband event in mourning, with a minute’s silence held at the start of the time trial stage at Bourg-Saint-Andeol.
Another silent tribute will be held at the end of the day’s riding at La Caverne du Pont d’Arc in the Ardeche region.
“We want this day to be dignified in homage to the victims,” said Tour director Christian Prudhomme.
Defending champion and race leader Chris Froome took to Twitter to express his sorrow.
“Thoughts are with those affected by the horrific terror attack in Nice,” the Briton wrote, alongside a picture of the French flag.
At Royal Troon, golfers wore black ribbons on their caps for the second round of the Open Championship.
The French flag flew at half mast over one of the stands around the 18th green at Troon on Scotland’s west coast.
France’s Clement Sordet, who lives in Nice, sported the message ‘Pray for Nice’.
“My thoughts are with the families and the victims. I woke up at 4am and tried to find out what had been going on, mainly on the radio,” Sordet said at the end of his round.
“The attack happened less than 500 meters from where I live. My girlfriend’s family come from there.”
A minute’s silence was also observed at Roscoff, on the Brittany coast on the first day of the Tour de France sailing regatta, which finishes on July 31 in the stricken Riviera resort of Nice.
The attack cast a pall over France’s quarter-final Davis Cup clash in the Czech Republic.
“We woke up in sadness. We are all affected so much,” France captain Noah, on the verge of tears, told journalists before the tie in the eastern Czech town of Trinec.
The French tennis great described the Bastille Day massacre as a heavy blow “for us, for our country, for all who are trying to give happiness.”
“Pray for Nice,” read a sign held by French fans, accompanied by a red heart.
The French team and officials stood together wearing black ribbons on their jackets.
They joined fans in singing the French national anthem, La Marseillaise, after a minute’s silence.
Spain’s Rafael Nadal paid tribute in a message in French.
“I’ve heard the news, and I am horrified by what’s happened in Nice. Support to the French people, to all the victims and their families” the 14-time major winner tweeted.
La Liga giants Real Madrid and Barcelona expressed their sorrow.
European champions Real “deeply regret the attack in Nice and want to convey our solidarity with the victims, families and all the French people.”
Real star Gareth Bale, the Wales captain who led his country to the Euro 2016 semifinals, took to Twitter, posting: “This has to stop!!! My thoughts are with everyone in Nice #PrayForNice” alongside a heart in the French tricolor.
Barcelona also took to social media to relay their “shock and grief after the attack in Nice. All our love and affection to the families and friends of the victims.”


Japan apologizes to those forcibly sterilized, vows redress

Updated 24 April 2019
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Japan apologizes to those forcibly sterilized, vows redress

  • An estimated 25,000 people were given unconsented sterilization while the 1948 Eugenics Protection Law was in place until 1996
  • The government had until recently maintained the sterilizations were legal at the time

TOKYO: Japan’s government apologized Wednesday to tens of thousands of victims forcibly sterilized under a now-defunct Eugenics Protection Law and promised to pay compensation.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said he was offering “sincere remorse and heartfelt apology” to the victims.
His apology comes just after the parliament enactment earlier Wednesday of legislation to provide redress measures, including $28,600 (¥3.2 million) compensation for each victim.
An estimated 25,000 people were given unconsented sterilization while the 1948 Eugenics Protection Law was in place until 1996. The law was designed to “prevent the birth of poor-quality descendants” and allowed doctors to sterilize people with disabilities. It was quietly renamed as the Maternity Protection Law in 1996, when the discriminatory condition was removed.
The redress legislation acknowledges that many people were forced to have operations to remove their reproductive organs or radiation treatment to get sterilized, causing them tremendous pain mentally and physically.
The government had until recently maintained the sterilizations were legal at the time.
The apology and the redress law follow a series of lawsuits by victims who came forward recently after breaking decades of silence. That prompted lawmakers from both ruling and opposition parties to draft a compensation package to make amends for the victims.
The plaintiffs are seeking about ¥30 million each ($268,000) in growing legal actions that are spreading around the country, saying the government’s implementation of the law violated the victims’ right to self-determination, reproductive health and equality. They say the government redress measures are too small for their suffering.
In addition to the forced sterilizations, more than 8,000 others were sterilized with consent, though likely under pressure, while nearly 60,000 women had abortions because of hereditary illnesses, according to Japan Federation of Bar Associations.
Among them were about 10,000 leprosy patients who had been confined in isolated institutions until 1996, when the leprosy prevention law was also abolished. The government has already offered compensation and an apology to them for its forced isolation policy.