SAGIA grants Pfizer 100% ownership of KSA business

Updated 29 July 2016
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SAGIA grants Pfizer 100% ownership of KSA business

RIYADH: Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) granted the US pharmaceutical company Pfizer Inc. 100 percent ownership of its business in the Kingdom to, among other things, import, export and trade in products, permitting a supply of quality innovative and essential medicines directly to the Saudi market.
The new license is effective immediately.
Majid Al-Qassabi, minister of commerce and investment, and chairman of SAGIA’s board of directors, said: “As one of the international companies investing in the Kingdom, Pfizer has been granted a trading license with 100 percent ownership, a step that will contribute to the expansion of its activities for the Saudization of the pharmaceutical industry in Saudi Arabia.
"The company proposed a distinct action plan for future projects and the Saudi government looks forward to providing Pfizer with the support it needs, as part of an effective partnership between the public and the private sector in order to achieve the development goals of the Kingdom, which are crystallized by Vision 2030, and part of which aims to enhance the role of the private sector in the Saudi economy.”
Pfizer plans to open in 2017 a facility in the King Abdullah Economic City to manufacture 16 of its leading medicines.
The trading license will also allow the company to consider many other investment projects aimed at advancing the health care goals of the National Transformation Program (NTP 2020), which is the first phase of Vision 2030, spearheaded by the Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) chaired by Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.
John Young, group president, Pfizer Essential Health, said: “We are honored to be one of the first companies to receive fast-track approval of a trading license.
"This is yet another step in our long-term commitment to the Kingdom and a reflection of our shared commitment, with the government, to provide a continued reliable supply of innovative and essential medicines to Saudi patients.”
He underlined that Pfizer’s obtaining the trading license from the SAGIA demonstrates the shared commitment to developing the Kingdom’s healthcare market.
“Pfizer Inc. has set the standard for quality, safety and value in the discovery, development and manufacture of healthcare products and its global portfolio includes medicines and vaccines as well as many of the world's best-known consumer healthcare products,” said Young.


Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

Updated 23 March 2019
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Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

  • Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China
  • Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets

BEIJING: Apple chief executive Tim Cook nudged China on Saturday to open up and said the future would depend on global collaboration, as the United States and China remained locked in a bitter trade dispute.
“We encourage China to continue to open up, we see that as essential, not only for China to reach its full potential, but for the global economy to thrive,” Cook said at a China Development Forum in Beijing.
Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets, some analysts worry that its reform project has slowed or even stalled under President Xi Jinping, who has sought greater control over the economy and a bigger role for state-owned firms at the expense of the private sector.
Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China because of a contracting smartphone market, increasing pressure from Chinese rivals, and slowing upgrade cycles. The company reported a revenue drop of 26 percent in the greater China region during the quarter ending in December.
Before those results came out, in a January letter to investors, Cook blamed the company’s poor China performance on trade tension between the United States and China, suggesting that pressure on the economy was hurting sales in China.