KSA seeks to solve housing crisis with 3D-printed homes

This apartment building was printed by Shanghai-based WinSun 3D. (Courtesy: 3DPrint.com)
Updated 06 August 2016
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KSA seeks to solve housing crisis with 3D-printed homes

RIYADH: Saudi officials have begun studying the use of 3D-printed houses as a way to solve the housing crisis in the Kingdom, which is expected to affect some 1.5 million people during the next five years. The homes are printed in prefabricated panels, which are fit together on site.
Saudi officials met with representatives of WinSun Decoration Design Engineering, a Chinese company that specializes in 3D printing, to explore the possibilities of this technology and to discuss how it could be used by the Ministry of Housing and other government bodies, as well as by research and development companies.
The firm gave a presentation on its skills and showed models for houses that have already been built in a number of countries, in addition to a building that was opened in the UAE last May. They also shared information on the first 3D-printed building in the Gulf — Future Office.
Following the high-profile meeting, it was not clear whether a deal will be signed to make this technology part of the housing crisis solution in Saudi Arabia.
The company’s representatives, however, said the use of 3D technology decreases the cost of labor by 70 percent and decreases construction waste by 60 percent.
The technology mixes waste construction material, glass, steel and cement together to form the houses, which is then sprayed on each surface to form a solid wall. According to the company, a unit can be printed in one day, and a small house can be built in just 30 minutes.
Dubai is the first city in the Gulf to use this technology. It says by 2030, 25 percent of its homes will be 3D printed.


Saudi Arabia FM: Khashoggi murder investigations will continue until all questions are answered

Updated 15 November 2018
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Saudi Arabia FM: Khashoggi murder investigations will continue until all questions are answered

  • Saudi Arabia is committed to holding those involved in the murder accountable through the judiciary
  • Al-Jubeir insisted that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had nothing to do with Khashoggi’s death

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s public prosecutor is still seeking answers to a number of questions in the investigation into Jamal Khashoggi's death, Foreign Minister Adel Al-Jubeir said on Thursday.

The Kingdom is committed to holding those involved in the murder accountable through the judiciary, and investigations into journalist’s killing will continue until all questions are answered, Al-Jubeir said.

Al-Jubeir added that the defendants and the victim in the Khashoggi case are Saudis and that the incident took place on Saudi land. He continued by saying that there has been an attempt to politicize Khashoggi’s case, and that this is regrettable.

Al-Jubeir insisted that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had nothing to do with Khashoggi’s death.

“The Qatari media have launched an organized campaign against Saudi Arabia and are exploiting Khashoggi’s case,” Al-Jubeir added.

He said there is a difference between imposing penalties on those accused and holding Saudi Arabia responsible for Khashoggi’s death.

Bahrain said Thursday that it rejects the politicization or internationalization of the Khashoggi case. 

The Secretariat General of the Arab League praised the seriousness of the steps taken by Saudi Arabia in the Khashoggi case, and said that the measures show the Kingdom's interest in identifying those involved in the crime. 

Hours after the public prosecurtor's statment, the US placed punishing economic sanctions on 17 Saudis allegedly involved in Khashoggi's murder.

"The Saudi officials we are sanctioning were involved in the abhorrent killing of Jamal Khashoggi," Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said. "These individuals who targeted and brutally killed a journalist who resided and worked in the United States must face consequences for their actions."

The Secretary-General of the Gulf Cooperation Council Dr. Abdullatif bin Rashid Al-Zayani said the details of the investigation released Thursday “confirm the Kingdom’s commitment to complete the necessary procedures in order to continue the investigation away from the politicization sought by some malicious parties.”  

Meanwhile, France's foreign ministry said Thursday that the investigation by Saudi Arabia's public prosecutor into the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi is a “step in the right direction.”