KSA seeks to solve housing crisis with 3D-printed homes

This apartment building was printed by Shanghai-based WinSun 3D. (Courtesy: 3DPrint.com)
Updated 06 August 2016
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KSA seeks to solve housing crisis with 3D-printed homes

RIYADH: Saudi officials have begun studying the use of 3D-printed houses as a way to solve the housing crisis in the Kingdom, which is expected to affect some 1.5 million people during the next five years. The homes are printed in prefabricated panels, which are fit together on site.
Saudi officials met with representatives of WinSun Decoration Design Engineering, a Chinese company that specializes in 3D printing, to explore the possibilities of this technology and to discuss how it could be used by the Ministry of Housing and other government bodies, as well as by research and development companies.
The firm gave a presentation on its skills and showed models for houses that have already been built in a number of countries, in addition to a building that was opened in the UAE last May. They also shared information on the first 3D-printed building in the Gulf — Future Office.
Following the high-profile meeting, it was not clear whether a deal will be signed to make this technology part of the housing crisis solution in Saudi Arabia.
The company’s representatives, however, said the use of 3D technology decreases the cost of labor by 70 percent and decreases construction waste by 60 percent.
The technology mixes waste construction material, glass, steel and cement together to form the houses, which is then sprayed on each surface to form a solid wall. According to the company, a unit can be printed in one day, and a small house can be built in just 30 minutes.
Dubai is the first city in the Gulf to use this technology. It says by 2030, 25 percent of its homes will be 3D printed.


Massive Saudi response overwhelms German musicians

German artists perform at Goethe-Institut in Riyadh on Tuesday night. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 13 December 2018
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Massive Saudi response overwhelms German musicians

  • German Ambassador Jorg Ranau hosted a concert at his residence in the diplomatic quarter

RIYADH: German musicians on tour in Saudi Arabia said they were “astonished” by the response to their concerts.
The artists played six gigs over 10 days at multiple venues.
On Tuesday evening in Riyadh the Goethe-Institut hosted Birgit Erichson and Vasil Laghidze, who performed Schubert’s “Winter Journey.”
The lyrics, by Wilhelm Müller, were recited in German by Claudia Ziegeler and — in a world premiere — in Arabic by the Saudi poet Dr. Adel Khamees Alzhrani.
“We are astonished at how the audience in Riyadh and Jeddah responded,” said pianist Laghidze. “We got overwhelming support from music lovers. The audience here is very enthusiastic.”
On Monday German Ambassador Jorg Ranau hosted a concert at his residence in the diplomatic quarter.
Laghidze and cellist Erichson were joined by violinist Ulrich Beetz, with the trio delighting a national and international gathering with music from Haydn, Schubert and Dvorak.
An embassy press officer told Arab News the musicians were well-received amid “thunderous applause.”
The French Consul General El-Mostafa Mihraje hosted the trio’s performance of an all-Debussy concert, including the famous Clair de Lune, played under the stars.
Other venues for the visiting artists included the German diplomatic missions in Riyadh and Jeddah, the French Consulate General in Jeddah and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, a research institute in Thuwal.