Top marks for economic reforms as Vision 2030 boosts confidence

Updated 08 August 2016
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Top marks for economic reforms as Vision 2030 boosts confidence

JEDDAH: The International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) encouraging assessment underscores the Saudi government's commitment to fiscal discipline and comes two years after it warned of the Kingdom's fiscal ruin, a top economist told Arab News Sunday.
“It's encouraging that the IMF sees a lower fiscal deficit albeit low growth for 2016 and 2017,” said John Sfakianakis, director of economic research at the Gulf Research Center.
“Saudi Arabia has embarked on the largest economic reform project over the last decades which the IMF acknowledges undoubtedly given its depth and breadth for an oil dominant economy,” Sfakianakis said.
A senior Saudi economist added that the Kingdom’s economy is stabilizing after the government implemented pivotal reforms.
Saudi Vision 2030 and the National Transformation Program (NTP) 2020 have made international financial institutions such as the IMF to change their views of the Kingdom’s economic progress, Said Al-Shaikh, chief economist at the National Commercial Bank, told Arab News.
“Over the course of 2016, several initiatives have been introduced, such as establishing of an SME commission and a venture capital fund besides passing of several laws including commercial laws,” the economist added.
In a recent report, Al-Rajhi Capital Research said the IMF expects the Saudi economy to stabilize its GDP growth to 2.25 percent, implying steady improvement over the next couple of years (1.2 percent in 2016).
Speaking to Bloomberg recently, Tim Callen, the IMF’s Saudi mission chief, commented: “The fiscal adjustment is under way. The government is very serious in bringing about that fiscal adjustment.
Callen added: “We’re happy with the progress that’s being made.”
In a related development, economists said that second-quarter earnings in Saudi Arabia’s petrochemical industry beat expectations as producers reaped the benefits of volatile oil prices.


Mideast plays key role in Chinese export of armed drones, report says

Updated 17 December 2018
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Mideast plays key role in Chinese export of armed drones, report says

  • China has exploited America’s selective drone export policy to become an increasingly influential player in meeting demand
  • The report is entitled “Armed Drones in the Middle East: Proliferation and Norms in the Region”

BEIRUT: The use of armed drones in the Middle East, driven largely by sales from China, has grown significantly in the past few years with an increasing number of countries and other parties using them in regional conflicts to lethal effects, a new report said Monday.
The report by the Royal United Services Institute, or RUSI, found that more and more Mideast countries have acquired armed drones, either by importing them, such as Jordan, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, or by building them domestically like Israel, Iran and Turkey.
China has won sales in the Middle East and elsewhere by offering drones — otherwise known as UAVs or unmanned aerial vehicles — at lower prices and without the political conditions attached by the United States.
The report , entitled “Armed Drones in the Middle East: Proliferation and Norms in the Region,” said that by capitalizing on the gap in the market over the past few years, Beijing has supplied armed drones to several countries that are not authorized to purchase them from the US, and at a dramatically cheaper price.
“China, a no-questions-asked exporter of drones, has played and is likely to continue playing a key role as a supplier of armed UAVs to the Middle East,” it said.
The report explored where and how each of the states have used their armed drones and whether they have changed the way these countries approach air power. It found that Iran, the UAE and Turkey all changed the way they employ airpower after they acquired armed drones.
For Turkey and the UAE, armed drones enabled them to conduct strikes in situations where they would not have risked using conventional aircraft, it said. Iran developed armed drones from the outset specifically to enable to project power beyond the reach of its air force, which is hamstrung by obsolete aircraft and sanctions, the report added.
The report said it remains to be seen whether and how the loosening of restrictions on the exportation of armed drones by the Trump administration will alter dynamics in the region.
“Nonetheless, proliferation in armed UAVs in the Middle East is unlikely to stop and could, in fact, even accelerate,” the report said.