Dhaka sets new guidelines for recruitment of housemaids

The Bangladeshi recruitment file has been met with some obstacles that contributed to the late arrival of workers. (AFP)
Updated 16 August 2016
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Dhaka sets new guidelines for recruitment of housemaids

JEDDAH: The Bangladeshi government, represented by its Ministry of Labor, has come up with five new guidelines and regulations that are expected to be implemented at the beginning of 2017.
These regulations aim to regulate domestic recruitment to Saudi Arabia, and guarantee the recruitment of those qualified to work, in addition to limiting brokers and decreasing the return of workers to their countries after they finish their contracts. These regulations also aim to maintain the rights of all parties and increase the number of domestic workers in the Kingdom.
A source at the Bangladeshi Consulate in Jeddah confirmed that the country’s Ministry of Labor is working on the establishment of a number of lists and regulations including decreasing the time needed to extract a medical and security certificate to one week instead of three to four weeks; increasing the number of recruitment offices in Bangladesh and imposing more supervision on them; increasing the training period for those registered in centers allocated to training maids to 45 days instead of 30 days; establishing a database to register the names of qualified workers and follow up on their recruitment in the Kingdom to avoid the recruitment of unqualified maids.
Hussein Al-Harithi, owner of a recruitment office, said the new regulations will contribute to the facilitation of recruitment and the decrease of the recruitment period to three months instead of seven months.
The Bangladeshi recruitment file has been met with some obstacles that contributed to the late arrival of workers, such as the increased cost of contracts with Bangladeshi offices; the recruitment of one male worker for each three female workers; some maids refusing to travel without their families; the increased demand, lack of supply and low wages which led to the accumulation of around 60 percent of visas issued by the Ministry of Labor in recruitment offices.


Yemen FM: No peace before Houthi disarmament

The Arab coalition is striving to rebuild the humanity destroyed by the Houthis, says Yemen’s Foreign Minister Khalid Al-Yamani. File/Getty Images
Updated 7 min 56 sec ago
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Yemen FM: No peace before Houthi disarmament

  • Alongside military operations, the coalition is undertaking humanitarian work to “rebuild the humanity destroyed by the Houthis
  • The Houthis’ “weapons and missiles must be handed over, and there is no room for dialogue or negotiation about them

LONDON: There cannot be peace in Yemen unless Houthi militias abandon their arms, said the country’s newly appointed Foreign Minister Khalid Al-Yamani.

The internationally recognized government will not allow Iran, which backs the Houthis, to maintain a foothold in Yemen or interfere in its internal affairs, he added.
“This terrorist regime” in Tehran, “which supplies terrorist militias all over the world, is close to collapse as a result of international and popular pressure by the Iranian people, who are suffering as their terrorist state spends billions here and there for a foolish expansionist idea,” Al-Yamani said.
“The modern and civilized world that respects international law cannot accept the existence of a state sponsor of terrorism and all subversive and terrorist militias in the region,” he added.
“If Iran wants to be part of the social, cultural and political fabric of our region, it must rationalize its behavior.” Its “terrorist behavior… encourages the spread of violence in the region,” he said.
Al-Yamani added that he will start his tenure as foreign minister by focusing on negotiations and the efforts of the UN special envoy to Yemen, Martin Griffiths.
The government is working round the clock with the envoy’s office so he can present his ideas on June 7 after consultations with the government, Al-Yamani said.
There will be meetings in the next few days with Yemeni President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, and a special meeting with the negotiating team, all within the framework of the envoy’s efforts in the region, Al-Yamani added.
Griffiths has visited several countries in the region, and has met with Yemen’s government and the leadership of the Saudi-led Arab coalition.
The Houthis “suggest that political arrangements should come before security and military arrangements,” said Al-Yamani.
But “the coup against the state in January 2015 came as a result of the preference of political over security arrangements,” he added.
“And after the Houthis achieved their goals, they turned against the national consensus reflected in the peace and partnership agreement, under which the president provided facilities to save the homeland from the fate we have reached today,” Al-Yamani said.
“We cannot talk about any political arrangements because we consider them to be a foregone conclusion if we achieve the withdrawal and delivery of heavy and medium weapons and missiles,” he added. “We cannot retry something we tried before... The coup must end.”
The Houthis’ “weapons and missiles must be handed over, and there is no room for dialogue or negotiation about them,” he said. “Heavy and medium weapons should be handed over, and those militias must be withdrawn.”
Al-Yamani criticized Iran’s ambassador to the UN for speaking in dovish language while his country causes destruction in Yemen.
“Most of what we have been able to remove of the mines planted by the Houthis had the trademark of Iranian industry,” Al-Yamani said.
“Even if we achieve peace today, we will need decades to demine... There will be no possibility of safe living in the areas where mines were planted.”
Al-Yamani expressed the gratitude of his government and people for the Saudi-led coalition’s support for the government to achieve security and peace in Yemen and the whole region.
Alongside military operations, the coalition is undertaking humanitarian work to “rebuild the humanity destroyed by the Houthis, rebuild the Yemeni psyche destroyed by the war, distribute goods throughout Yemen, and reconstruct what was destroyed by the Houthi war machine,” he said.
“All this confirms that the project of restoring the state… is the project of life,” which is “opposed to the project of death brought by Iran and its Houthi militias to Yemen,” he added.
This interview is simultaneously published in Asharq Al-Awsat.