Over 3 million Saudi women without IDs

Updated 17 August 2016
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Over 3 million Saudi women without IDs

JEDDAH: More than 3 million Saudi women, aged 15 and above, do not have national IDs.
The number of applications from women for IDs has jumped from 70,000 to 104,000 in just seven days, said Mohammed Al-Jasser, Civil Affairs spokesman.
Many citizens have complained about the difficulty in getting appointments at the Civil Affairs offices, especially in the Eastern Province.
This has forced the applicants to wait several months for IDs and as a result, they have missed employment opportunities because IDs are mandatory for Saudis seeking jobs.
To deal with it, Al-Jasser said the Civil Affairs prepared a plan to receive a large number of applicants and reduce crowding by opening more offices for women in all regions.
The plan also includes increasing the capacity of employees to process applications at some offices during weekends and evening hours in order to serve as many women as possible.
Several bodies and agencies, such as the General Directorate of Passports, colleges, telecom service providers, courts, and the National Center for Assessment, made the national ID mandatory for completing employment procedures. This resulted in overcrowding in the Civil Affairs offices all over the Kingdom.


‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. (AN photo)
Updated 24 September 2018
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‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

  • Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life

JEDDAH: “Our History is Misk,” supported by the Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz Foundation, is being organized at the historical site of Jeddah.
The event is bringing nostalgia through a number of scenes that embody the life the city witnessed decades ago.
It comes as one of the activities of the foundation’s initiatives center and is part of its role in encouraging creativity and promoting national values in society.
The activities include an open theater to portray the professions of Jeddah citizens in the past. A number of local actors brought 20 extinct professions back to life through their performances.
One of the actors sits in the center, playing the role of the mayor, who used to help the people and solved their differences. Also showcased were the “decorator,” who is similar to barbers nowadays, the distribution of fabrics used in houses at the time, the selling of water in alleys for nominal amounts of money, and the restoration and cleaning of shoes.
Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. In them, people with all kinds of professions met to drink tea and listen to a storyteller.