KSA may get heaviest rain in 21 years

TORRENTIAL: Extreme weather conditions had caused heavy rainfall of 120 mm in only two hours in Jeddah in 2011.
Updated 05 September 2016
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KSA may get heaviest rain in 21 years

JEDDAH: The Arab Peninsula will experience this year a wave of heavy rain not witnessed in the region for the past 21 years due to the La Nina factor, a weather expert has said.
“La Nina is a complex weather pattern resulting from variations in ocean temperatures in the Western and Central Pacific regions. It affected the region several years ago in 1996 and 2010. This weather pattern is characterized by heavy rain,” Turki Al-Jamman told local media.
According to him, La Nina is one of the most extreme weather conditions and enjoys much attention of physicists, and considered one of the most important climate phenomena.
“La Nina is a result of active easterly winds over the Pacific. This wind activity is in turn the result of high pressure over Tahiti and low pressure over Darwin area to the West of the Pacific and East of Australia. La Nina affects other phenomena called Amo, Wtio, Nao, and Ao,” said Al-Jamman.
In 1996, this phenomenon was active over the Pacific, so Jeddah recorded heavy rainfall, that is 255 mm according to the measures of the Saudi meteorology authorities, he said, adding that according to the German GPCC, the rainfall was more than 300 mm in mid-November.
Al-Jamman said that in 2010, the same phenomenon affected the coasts of Jeddah with extreme weather conditions. “And in 2011, such extreme weather conditions caused heavy rainfall of 120 mm in only two hours in Jeddah, resulting in severe flooding and loss of life and property,“
The world witnessed other extreme weather conditions last year such as El Nino, with the Arab Peninsula witnessing the highest temperatures last summer, added Al-Jamman.


Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, said Saudi Arabia's foreign minister. (AFP)
Updated 16 November 2018
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Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

  • Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, says Saudi FM
  • Al-Jubeir: Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict

RIYADH: The Saudi-led coalition is working with UN envoy Martin Griffith to reach a political solution to the conflict in Yemen based on UN Security Council resolution 2216, the Gulf Initiative and the outcomes of Yemeni national dialogue, the Saudi foreign minister said on Thursday. 

“Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, and the solution should lead to the restoration of legitimacy in Yemen,” said Adel Al-Jubeir.

“We support a peaceful solution in Yemen. We support the efforts of the UN envoy for the Yemeni cause,” he added.

“We are committed to providing all humanitarian support to our brothers there. We are also working on the post-war reconstruction of Yemen.” The Kingdom supports the envoy’s efforts to hold negotiations at the end of November, added Al-Jubeir.

Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict, he said.

In contrast, Houthi militias are imposing restrictions on Yemeni cities and villages, leading to starvation, he added. 

They are also seizing humanitarian aid and preventing Yemenis from getting cholera vaccinations, Al-Jubeir said. 

The Houthis fire ballistic missiles indiscriminately at Saudi Arabia, use children as fighters and plant mines across Yemen, he added. 

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, he said.

Saudi Arabia did not want the conflict in Yemen; it was imposed on the Kingdom, Al-Jubeir added. 

Saudi Arabia worked with other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states to develop the Gulf Initiative. 

This led to a transition from former President Ali Abdullah Saleh to the internationally recognized government headed by current President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.

The Kingdom also worked to develop Yemeni national dialogue that led to a Yemeni vision regarding the country’s future.

A new Yemeni constitution was about to be drafted when the Houthis seized much of the country, including the capital. 

Yemen’s legitimate government requested support, and the Saudi-led coalition responded under Article 51 of the UN Charter.