Hijabs dazzle NY fashion catwalk

Updated 16 September 2016

Hijabs dazzle NY fashion catwalk

NEW YORK: A collection presented at New York Fashion Week is the first time every model walked the event’s runway wearing a hijab.

Indonesian designer Anniesa Hasibuan, 30, delighted crowds with her Spring Summer ‘17 collection D’Jakarta. Models wore flowing trousers and skirts in silk, lace and chiffon in an array of pastel colors.
One stand-out garment included an intricate gold lace dress, featuring metallic embroidery at the bust and a fringed lace train.
Each model wore a hijab in gold, pale pink or dove grey silk. It is believed to be the first time a New York Fashion Week catwalk show has featured hijabs on every model.
Hasibuan also made history as the first Indonesian designer to be featured at the fashion week and says her designs were inspired by her home city of Jakarta, where she also has a boutique.
The show consisted of 48 different looks, of which 10 were evening gowns and 38 were ready-to-wear pieces.
Following the show, Hasibuan took to the runway, where she received a standing ovation from the audience.
Fashion experts welcomed the collection, with reviewer Maha Syeda writing: “The Indonesian designer brought together the perfect elements of her cultural home country and the metropolitan western fashion world to create a beautiful harmony of fashion and modesty, because, yes — they don’t have to clash.”
Fans of the designer took to social media to praise for the collection, with one fan calling the show “absolutely breathtaking”. Another wrote “this was everything!”


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.