India’s top court says: BCCI ‘behaving like lords’

Updated 28 September 2016
0

India’s top court says: BCCI ‘behaving like lords’

NEW DELHI: India’s top court slammed the country’s powerful cricket board on Wednesday for failing to comply with stipulated reforms following corruption scandals, saying its officials were “behaving like lords.”
The Supreme Court instructed the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to “fall in line” with a retired judge’s proposals for sweeping changes to the cash-rich organization’s structure and way of working.
Former Chief Justice Rajendra Mal Lodha and his panel told the court that the BCCI’s heads should be replaced as they were dragging their heels on the reforms, adding that a string of e-mails to officials had gone unanswered.
The BCCI, one of the most powerful organizations in world sport, has insisted it is not “running away” from implementing the reforms after scandals including accusations of corruption and match fixing in the glitzy Indian Premier League.
The court in New Delhi ordered the BCCI to comply with the recommendations, adding that the organization was not above the law, the Press Trust of India news agency said.
“If the BCCI thinks that they are a law unto themselves, then they are wrong. They have to comply with the directions of the court,” the bench of judges headed by Chief Justice T S Thakur said.
“You (BCCI) are behaving like lords. Fall in line otherwise we will make you fall in line.”
The Lodha panel, appointed by the Supreme Court, proposed changes to the BCCI in January to be introduced within six months.
The reforms, most of which the court accepted, include new operating and governance rules that bar ministers and bureaucrats from holding BCCI posts, along with age and tenure restrictions for top officials.
The Lodha panel was frustrated by the BCCI’s decision to go ahead with making new appointments at its annual general meeting this month. The panel had warned against the move because the reforms had not yet been introduced, the court heard.
The panel last year announced two teams were being suspended from the IPL after top officials were caught illegally betting on matches involving their own teams in the Twenty20 competition.


Sri Lanka’s Lakmal replaces banned Chandimal as skipper

Updated 23 June 2018
0

Sri Lanka’s Lakmal replaces banned Chandimal as skipper

  • The West Indies are 1-0 up in the series with the final match, the first ever day-night Test in the Caribbean, due to begin later on Saturday in Barbados
  • Earlier this year, Australian cricket was rocked to its foundations after a player was caught applying sandpaper to the ball in a match in South Africa

COLOMBO: Sri Lanka on Saturday named Suranga Lakmal as skipper for the potentially series-saving third Test against the West Indies after Dinesh Chandimal lost his appeal against a one-match ban for ball tampering.
“Lakmal was appointed as the captain, in the absence of Dinesh Chandimal,” Sri Lanka Cricket said in a brief statement, without commenting on Chandimal’s case.
The West Indies are 1-0 up in the series with the final match, the first ever day-night Test in the Caribbean, due to begin later on Saturday in Barbados.
Chandimal, 28, was given the ban after being spotted by television cameras during the second Test applying saliva to the ball, apparently with a sweet in his mouth.
The International Cricket Council (ICC) on Friday dismissed Chandimal’s appeal. A fine of 100 percent of his match fee and two suspension points were also upheld.
Chandimal, coach Chandika Hathurusingha and manager Asanka Gurusinha also face possible disciplinary action after refusing to take to the field for two hours after the incident.
The three admitted on Friday “conduct... contrary to the spirit of the game” and will face a preliminary ICC hearing on July 10.
Hathurusinghe and Gurusinha were on Friday however allowed to continue to perform their duties in the meantime, including in the third Test.
Chandimal’s ban is the latest blow to Sri Lankan cricket following a string of defeats — including a Test and one-day whitewash to India — and corruption allegations.
Earlier this year, Australian cricket was rocked to its foundations after a player was caught applying sandpaper to the ball in a match in South Africa.
Steve Smith and David Warner were stripped of the captaincy and vice-captaincy respectively and banned from playing international cricket for 12 months.