Don’t diet: Healthier ideas to lose weight

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Updated 07 October 2016
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Don’t diet: Healthier ideas to lose weight

So, who has tried getting on a diet and sticking to it? I know you’re mentally raising your hand guilty as charged, I for one don’t believe in diets as much as I believe in using the term “changing food habits.” There is always this nagging voice in your head that keeps reminding you to drop those chips and order water instead of coke, for once that nagging voice is right! We do need to cut down on things that not only accumulate in the mid section, but can cause serious damage to our bodies inside and out. This isn’t news to us all, we’re just not listening properly.
To continue the decluttering of your lifestyle, we already covered major changes as well as conquering those stressful unorganized objects that could cause your stress levels to be elevated, so we decluttered and de-stressed. Having some peace of mind is exactly how everyone should live their lives, regardless of the ups and downs that occur on a daily basis, but you can deal with it I’m sure. Let’s talk diets! How many times have you followed through with a diet? Some studies find that 73 percent of people don’t follow through after about five weeks of dieting, some are higher and some lower, but generally it’s found that many have difficult times sticking to a diet. So don’t, yes don’t.
Labeling food is just annoying so we opt for “improving” or “changing food habits” to “lifestyle” to just simply “food”. This transition is gradual and will allow you to understand that changing your eating and food choices mean that you need to be deprived of it, you can indulge in so many foods but change the way they’re cooked for example or the ratio of protein vs vegetables, etc. There are many ways in which you can change and spice up your diet. Keep in mind:
• Consume less sugar and add more fruits and vegetables.
• Opt for one meatless day, for example, meatless Monday, consuming large amounts of red meat high in saturated fat raises cholesterol levels which can lead to a higher risk in heart diseases.
• Use less salt.
• Stop consuming fried foods.
• Legumes, nuts, oats, brown rice are necessary but not in excess amounts.

It’s all about prioritizing honestly and deciding which path you’ll want. Naturally, you’ll chose the healthier option. And why not? There are plenty of choices to 1) help lose weight 2) lower cholesterol 3) help decrease occurrences of non-communicable diseases and so much more. Just eating nuts such as almonds can ensure bone building material, almonds also help the appearance of your skin due to the high levels of vitamin E, cashews provide good levels of protein, zinc and iron and decrease age-related memory loss, and pecans are rich in anti-oxidants that help prevent plaque formation in the arteries. And that’s just the tip of the pyramid, clean eating is your target path.
Clean eating doesn’t require much, please don’t head to your nearest supermarket and buy the whole “diets” aisle, try substituting one item from the unhealthy list to the healthy list. You like chips, make them at home using real potatoes, for example, change it up a bit and use parsnips and sweet potatoes for a more colorful variety. Try eating at home for one week, nothing from restaurants or buffets, you’ll see that first your tastebuds will approve, your GI tract will thank you and lastly just peeking at your bank account will have you at ease, no I’m not being sarcastic, the less money you spend on unhealthy food, the more stress prone you’ll be. Don’t believe me, try it yourself and watch how your mood plummets as your bank account shows a number you’re not happy about.
Moving from “improving food habits” to “changing” it is a major step, the best way to transition is by making sure you’re comfortable. Comfortable with the small changes you’ve added, comfortable with less sugar in your coffee or slice of cake every now and then (no, not every other day, every now and then) and removing the salt shaker from the dining table does make a difference. You’ll feel the changes both mentally and physically, knowing that you’re cutting out unhealthy dishes and substituting them with something more fresh, more colorful that will reflect on your mood, you’ll feel lighter, calmer not to mention no more upset stomachs. There is no need to create major shifts in your lifestyle to feel complete, it’s the simple and minor changes that make a bigger impact, just enough as to not shock your brain nerves.
It’s normal to succumb to the voice in your head but ask yourself, do you want healthy hair even at the age of 60? Less wrinkles? Would you like your memory to be top notch and healthy by 70 or even 80? Yes, it is possible with proper clean eating, it’s never too early to start. Don’t let those blue, animal looking gummy candies convince you that it can ensure you long, thick and shiny hair, there’s nothing better than proper nutrients from actual food. Pass the sweet potato chips with yogurt, it’s time to watch some American football.


Virtual reality to improve patient experience in health care

Eng. Faisal Ayman Ashour helps introduce virtual reality (VR) to Saudi hospitals in 2018. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 16 February 2019
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Virtual reality to improve patient experience in health care

  • Saudi engineer’s innovation will help people with anxiety, addictions
  • Experiments must be completed before an idea can be distributed, that sometimes takes more than 10 years,” said Ashour

JEDDAH: Virtual reality (VR) is a computer-based three-dimensional imaging sequence that creates a world within a computer system, allowing users to interact with it via a display screen, usually mounted to the face.
Previously, VR had only really impacted the public through video games, but Eng. Faisal Ayman Ashour looked at it differently.
He saw it as a potential non-pharmacologic form of pain relief, by delivering enough sensory information to reduce patient anxiety, eliminating the need for sedatives.
Many hospitals around the world have started experimenting with it. A Calgary hospital recorded 75 percent reductions in discomfort monitoring patients using it, while another at Stanford in the US had similar results when using VR to distract children from receiving previously distressing procedures.
Ashour helped introduce VR to Saudi hospitals last year.
“I always believed every human has a purpose and a mission in this life, we all have talent within us, the challenge is how we develop such a talent. Not to reinvent the wheel and share someone else’s work, but to develop it. VR was invented for entertainment mostly, but such technology can enhance the patient’s quality of life at a low cost,” he said.
The target patients are children and those in palliative care, receiving procedures as simple as a vaccination, or as painful as resetting bones and applying casts.
“I’ve developed and gained more knowledge by merging engineering with medicine. I got my fellowship in medicine to speak the same language as physicians, to develop a solid medical simulation-training program in the Kingdom. Since 2016 I’ve developed several applications involving VR and alternative reality to help patients,” Ashour added.
VR technology in medicine has also been implemented in radiotherapy, CT scans, MRIs, physiotherapy and psychology. This progress hasn’t been without problems, however.
“Introducing such a new technology or concept to be used to replace a previous technique is challenging, especially in the medical field. Experiments must be completed before an idea can be distributed, that sometimes takes more than 10 years,” said Ashour.
“The idea was to engage engineers and physicians to introduce such a modern technology to enhance patient quality of life, and maximize cost efficiency. We have developed more than 10 virtual environments for both medical training purposes, and to improve medical outcomes.”