Saudi designers dazzle at Dubai fashion week

A model presents a creation by Saudi Arabia's Suzan Farhoud and Leen Al-Shishakly during the Arab Fashion Week on Saturday in Dubai. (AFP)
Updated 10 October 2016
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Saudi designers dazzle at Dubai fashion week

DUBAI: From a mother and daughter duo hooked on denim to an art-inspired fashionista, female designers from Saudi Arabia stole the limelight at Arab Fashion Week 2016 in Dubai.
Models strutted the catwalk late Saturday in mini-dresses, cropped jackets, skin-tight jeans and flamboyantly embroidered transparent blouses. They were the work of Suzan Farhoud and her daughter Leen Al-Shieshakly, who set up their “Jeans Couture” brand just a year ago, hoping to share their passion for denim. Farhoud designs the clothes, while Shieshakly creates bags and manages the business. “We wanted the Saudis... not to look at denim in a casual way,” Shieshakly said, but also to “wear it for a formal event.” “We wanted to get the denim into the Saudi market as well as the Middle East,” said the US-educated 26-year-old, who wore her dark hair in a short bob. 

“Since I am half Arab and half Western I wanted to mix modern and elegant,” she said.
They say their creations have been well-received in Saudi Arabia.
Their casual designs contrasted with those of another Saudi designer, Arwa Al-Ammari, whose style mixes luxury with elegance and art.
Her models drew everyone’s gaze as they walked down the catwalk in dresses, coats, skirts and tops of structured, layered fabric.
Elegant enough for an English tea party, her designs were decorated with leaves, flowers, and even big birds.
Caroline Rush, chief executive of the British Fashion Council, said she believes conservative designs are gaining traction in the West.
“I think that modest fashion is certainly something that is growing in the Western world,” she told AFP.
She described the Saudi designers’ collections as “very different in terms of style but very open.”
“The soft power around the creative industry and particularly fashion does have a very powerful message in terms of showing how cultures are changing,” she said. “(Fashion) is a fantastic way to be able to show that.”


’Blurred Lines’ legal saga ends in $5mn ruling favoring Marvin Gaye family

Updated 14 December 2018
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’Blurred Lines’ legal saga ends in $5mn ruling favoring Marvin Gaye family

  • “The verdict handicaps any creator out there who is making something that might be inspired by something else,” Pharell Williams said
  • The initial award in the case had triggered an angry response from many songwriters, who argued that there were major differences between the two songs at the center of the legal battle

LOS ANGELES: A long-running copyright dispute over the smash hit “Blurred Lines” has ended with the family of Motown legend Marvin Gaye winning a nearly $5 million judgment against Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams.
Thicke and Williams had been accused by Gaye’s estate of copyright infringement for their 2013 hit because of similarities with the late singer’s “Got to Give It Up.”
In 2015, the estate was awarded more than $7 million but the amount was later reduced to $5.3 million
Thicke and Pharrell appealed that judgment and a California judge earlier this year overall upheld the jury’s decision.
In a December 6 final ruling in the case made public on Thursday, US District Judge John Kronstadt ordered Thicke, Williams and Williams’ publishing company to pay Gaye’s estate $2.9 million in damages, US media reported.
Thicke was ordered to pay an additional $1.76 million. Williams and his publishing company must also separately pay Gay’s estate nearly $360,000.
Gaye’s family was also rewarded 50 percent of the song’s royalties.
The verdict caps a long-drawn legal battle that was closely watched by the music industry.
The initial award in the case had triggered an angry response from many songwriters, who argued that there were major differences between the two songs at the center of the legal battle, including the melodies and lyrics.
Williams, a popular songwriter who had another smash hit with “Happy,” said in an interview in 2015 that all creative people had inspirations.
“The verdict handicaps any creator out there who is making something that might be inspired by something else,” he said at the time.
“If we lose our freedom to be inspired, we’re going to look up one day and the entertainment industry as we know it will be frozen in litigation.”
Representatives of both Williams and Thicke could not be immediately reached for comment.