Yasir Al-Yasiri starts filming for new Arabic comedy in UAE

The story follows four elderly men spending the latter years of their lives in a senior home until their world is turned around.
Updated 11 October 2016
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Yasir Al-Yasiri starts filming for new Arabic comedy in UAE

ABU DHABI: Image Nation Abu Dhabi, a leading media and entertainment company, has announced that production has begun on its newest feature film “On Borrowed Time”.
Having kicked off on Sept. 16, the production will be shooting for one month at locations around Dubai including famous landmarks such as Atlantis The Palm and SEGA at Dubai Mall.
The feel-good comedy is written and directed by filmmaker and music video pioneer Yasir Al-Yasiri, produced by Rami Yasin, with Emirati director Majid Al-Ansari serving as executive producer along with Mansour Al-Feeli.
Director Al-Yasiri, whose first short film was nominated for an award at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2013, commented, “I am excited to be making my first feature-length film with such a renowned studio as Image Nation, whose reputation of supporting artistic and forward- thinking filmmakers is critical to the establishment of a film and television industry in the UAE. The script is based on the short story of famous poet and celebrated songwriter Kareem Al-Iraqi and is an inspiring story of human adventure and unquenchable hope”.
The narrative follows four elderly men spending the latter years of their lives in a senior home, down and dejected, until their world is turned around when one of them inherits 50 million dirhams and is able to support the dreams they had all but forgotten.
The production enlists an all-star cast of Arabic talent including renowned Kuwaiti actor Saad Al-Faraj (Souq Al-Maqases, Darb Al-Zalag); Syrian star Salloum Hadad (Al-Kawasir As Shaqeef); Emirati actors Mansoor Al-Feeli (Qalb Al-Adala, Dishoom) and Marie Al-Halyan (Khiyanat Watan, Wadeema Wa Haleema) in the four lead roles.
Ben Ross, Head of narrative film and television at Image Nation said: “The recent success of Arabic films such as ‘Zinzana’ and ‘Theeb’ not just locally but around the world, proved that global audiences have an appetite for regional stories.”


‘Hotel Transylvania 3’ blurs the line between good and bad

A still from the kid-friendly film. (Sony Pictures Animation)
Updated 23 July 2018
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‘Hotel Transylvania 3’ blurs the line between good and bad

  • The characters are sharply etched out, with pointed features and wonderful detail

CHENNAI: Nothing can be compared to Japanese animation, especially the works of cinematic art created by Hayao Miyazaki (“Spirited Away,” “Princess Mononoke,” “The Wind Rises”), which is not just sharply political but also intensely emotional. In comparison, American animated films may seem somewhat plastic, though the Hotel Transylvania franchise has risen above the mundane. The latest installment,” Hotel Transylvania 3: A Monster Vacation,” from director Genndy Tartakovsky, depicts a battle between good and evil.
The plot sees Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler), his daughter Mavis (Selena Gomez), her human husband Johnny (Andy Samberg) and the entire monster entourage go on a cruise vacation to Atlantis. On board, widowed and lonely Dracula falls head over heels in love with the director of the event, Ericka (Kathryn Hahn). However — plot twist! — she is a human being and several centuries younger. Even worse, she is the granddaughter of the legendary vampire hunter Abraham Van Helsing (Jim Gaffigan), whose bitter enmity with Dracula dates back to the 1800s. It is liberally interspersed with humor, which comes courtesy of the Mummy, the Invisible Man and the giant puppy that Dracula's grandson smuggles aboard the ship.
Tartakovsky, who helmed all three editions of the franchise, undoubtedly employed a brilliant set of animators — the characters are sharply etched out, with pointed features and wonderful detail. The wit flows at a breathless pace, but what is lacking is a certain novelty, which one expects in an ongoing series.
One plus point is that parents will not find themselves wanting for entertainment. Dracula's romance with Ericka may be lost on children, but it will keep the adults entertained. At 97 minutes long, however, the film could have been far more fantastic.