Passengers warned on Galaxy Note 7

This Sept. 8 photo shows a damaged Samsung Galaxy Note 7, in Marion, Illinois, belonging to Joni Gantz Barwick, who was woken up at 3 a.m. by smoke and sparks from her Galaxy Note 7. Her nightstand and bed sheets were burned. (AP)
Updated 15 October 2016
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Passengers warned on Galaxy Note 7

SINGAPORE: Singapore Airlines said it has banned Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 mobile phones from all its flights and any passenger carrying one will not be allowed to board its planes.
The US Department of Transportation has issued an emergency order banning the devices from aircraft in the US as of Saturday 1600 GMT.
Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. has recalled its flagship Galaxy Note 7 smartphones worldwide because of incidents of the phones emitting smoke or catching fire, dealing a huge blow to the company’s reputation.
Singapore Airlines said on its Facebook page that “the Galaxy Note 7 smartphone will be prohibited from being brought on board all our flights in person, in carry-on baggage or checked-in baggage with effect from 16 October.”
Passengers caught attempting to travel with the phones will have the phones confiscated and may face fines, the US Transport Department said.
The Consumer Product Safety Commission says there have been nearly 100 reports of batteries in Note 7 phones overheating in the US. One fire erupted on a Southwest Airlines flight earlier this month. In another case, a family in St. Petersburg, Florida, reported a Galaxy Note 7 phone left charging in their Jeep caught fire, destroying the vehicle.
The Federal Aviation Administration had previously warned passengers not to pack the phones in their checked bags and to power them off and not charge them while on board planes.
“We recognize that banning these phones from airlines will inconvenience some passengers, but the safety of all those aboard an aircraft must take priority,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “We are taking this additional step because even one fire incident inflight poses a high risk of severe personal injury and puts many lives at risk.”
Samsung said in a statement that it is working with the department to make customers aware of the ban.
The company also urged Note 7 customers to get a refund or exchange their phones by visiting their phone service provider or retail store.
The Note 7 isn’t the only gadget to catch fire thanks to lithium-battery problems, which have afflicted everything from laptops to Tesla cars to Boeing’s 787 jetliner.
At least three US airlines are adding new fire-suppression equipment to fleets in case a cellphone or laptop battery overheats, catches on fire and can’t be extinguished.
Rechargeable lithium batteries are more susceptible to overheating than other types of batteries if they are exposed to high temperatures, are damaged or have manufacturing flaws.
Once overheating starts, it can lead to “thermal runaway” in which temperatures continue escalating to very high levels.
Water can extinguish the flames, but doesn’t always halt the thermal runaway. Flames will often reappear after initially being quenched.
Lithium batteries are ubiquitous in consumer electronic devices. Manufacturers like them because they weigh less and pack considerably more energy into the same space than other types of batteries.
Earlier this year, the International Civil Aviation Organization, a UN agency that sets global aviation safety standards, banned bulk shipments of rechargeable lithium-ion batteries as cargo on passenger planes until better packaging can be developed to prevent a fire from spreading and potentially destroying the plane.


Russia’s RDIF to boost investment deals in Saudi Arabia

Updated 17 January 2019
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Russia’s RDIF to boost investment deals in Saudi Arabia

  • Fund's CEO Kirill Dmitriev leads a delegation of more than 20 Russian business figures to the Kingdom
  • The delegation discussed projects in oil refining, petrochemical, gas chemical and oilfield services

RIYADH: Russian sovereign wealth fund RDIF said on Wednesday it would significantly boost its investments deals with Saudi Arabia in 2019.

The fund’s CEO Kirill Dmitriev led a delegation of more than 20 Russian business figures to the Kingdom to discuss new projects.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih met Dmitriev in Riyadh and expressed his happiness on the progress they made in the talks and the cooperation between the two countries. 

“Its not only commercial cooperation, but we are also working on scientific research, and we have opened a research center in Moscow University,” Al-Falih said.

The minister said the Russian delegation will also meet officials from Saudi Basic Industries Corporation SABIC and mining company Ma’aden among other companies during their three day visit to the Kingdom.

The delegation discussed projects in oil refining, petrochemical, gas chemical and oilfield services sectors, a Russian Direct Investment Fund statement said.

Al-Falih added that the Russian side has started a rubber plant project in Al-Jubail with Total and Novomet.

RDIF already has a $10 billion investment partnership with the Saudi Public Investment Fun (PIF), with more than $2 billion already invested in projects.

“We extend our cooperation not only on oil cuts but to cooperate in oil services, technology, LG and petrochemicals,” Dmitriev said. “We believe Saudi Aramco can be one of the greatest partners of Russia.”

The CEO said they were continuing to cooperate with PIF in Saudi Arabia through a number of energy investments.

Russian companies are also keen to invest in the Kingdom’s planned $500 billion mega-city NEOM.

“We have companies that have interest to invest in NEOM, we would like to build a port in NEOM, it can be a big port,” Dmitriev said.