Turkish film shines light on child brides

Eylem Atakav
Updated 16 October 2016
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Turkish film shines light on child brides

LONDON: Child brides in Turkey are often raped, beaten and forced to undergo virginity tests, according to the director of a new documentary which aims to break the silence on the taboo issue.
“Growing Up Married,” which will premiere in London on Oct. 30, examines the impact of child marriage on four women who were wed as teenagers in western Turkey.
“When hearing some of their stories I thought to myself ‘how are you still alive?’,” filmmaker Eylem Atakav said in an interview with the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
“There are lots of stories about child brides, but very few that look at what happens to them after,” said Atakav, a lecturer in film and television studies at the University of East Anglia in Britain.
The Turkish-born director said her filming trip to Izmir in July revealed survivors felt an urgent need to speak out.
“I had spent the day interviewing two of my parents’ neighbors about their experiences,” she recalled.
“Then there was a knock on the door — three women from the neighborhood came to ask if I was making a film about child brides and said that they wanted to talk about their experiences too.”
The women in the film, now in their 30s to 50s, were married between the ages of 14 and 17.
“They put a wedding gown on me one night and took me to some place I had never seen before — I (have) remained silent ever since,” one of the women says in the film.
Another describes how she used to dread night-time because her husband would drag her to the bedroom where he “took pleasure out of pulling my hair.”
I used to collect all my hair from the floor and pillows every morning. Then I started cutting my hair so that he couldn’t hurt me as much.”
Atakav said the film also revealed more “insidious” forms of abuse.
Only one of the four women in the film is still married to her husband, said Atakav. Two are divorced and one has remarried but her former husband has banned her from seeing her daughter.
“These women have somehow managed to go on with their lives but you can see the pain on their faces,” Atakav said.
Campaign group Girls Not Brides says Turkey has one of the highest rates of child marriage in Europe, with an estimated 15 percent of girls married before the age of 18.
The minimum age of marriage in Turkey is 17 years, although marriage at 16 can be allowed with court approval.
Atakav hopes her documentary will raise awareness of “this invisible issue, and be a tool for women’s voices to be heard everywhere.”
“What I’d really like is to go show the film in Turkey,” she said. “Only privileged families, if anyone, have access to these types of films when those who most need (to see) them don’t.”


Kim, Trump impersonators draw ire of Vietnam’s authorities

Updated 23 February 2019
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Kim, Trump impersonators draw ire of Vietnam’s authorities

  • The duo has been making rounds of Hanoi, taking pictures with curious onlookers ahead of the second summit of the two leaders next week

HANOI, Vietnam: Vietnamese authorities are not amused by the antics of two impersonators of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump.
The duo has been making rounds of Hanoi, taking pictures with curious onlookers ahead of the second summit of the two leaders next week.
However, on late Friday, a Kim lookalike, the Hong Kong-based impersonator who uses the name Howard X, posted on Facebook that about 15 police or immigration officers demanded a mandatory “interview” with them following a talk they gave at the state-run VTV1 channel.
“They then said that this was a very sensitive time in the city due to the Trump/Kim summit and that our impersonation was causing a ‘disturbance’ and ... suggested that we do not do the impersonation in public for the duration of our stay as these presidents have many enemies and that it was for our own safety.”
According to Howard X, there was a back-and-forth with an unnamed Vietnamese officer who “did not seem pleased with my answer” and threatened the impersonators with deportation, saying they were breaking immigration rules. Finally, he said they were driven back to their hotel and told to stay put until authorities decide how to treat them.
“Although I am not surprised that I got detained for doing my impersonation in Vietnam, it’s still pretty annoying. What it shows is that Vietnam has a long way to go before they will be a developed country and I wonder if they ever will under these conditions,” he wrote on his Facebook page. “If the Vietnamese authorities are willing to give this kind of harassment over something as trivial as an impersonation to a high-profile foreigner, imagine what all the Vietnamese artists, musicians, film producers and all the political activists have to endure for simply wanting to release a controversial film, songs or for simply speaking up about real injustices in this country.”
Vietnam is a tightly controlled communist country that tolerates no dissent.
Howard X was also questioned by Singaporean immigration authorities when he and his colleague appeared in the city-state for the first Kim-Trump summit last June.
The impersonator’s real name is Lee Howard Ho Wun.