Nokia Middle East launches new smartphone range in Arabic

Updated 13 November 2012
0

Nokia Middle East launches new smartphone range in Arabic

DUBAI: Nokia Middle East launched yesterday the Nokia Lumia 920 and the Nokia Lumia 820, the world’s most innovative smartphones based on Windows Phone 8 in the region with exclusive operator partnership with Mobily in the Kingdom.
In the United Arab Emirates, du will be the exclusive telecom carrier to offer the Nokia smartphone in the Emirates.
Nokia Middle East Vice President Tom Farrell, Mobily Vice President for Corporate Communications Humoud Al-Ghobaini and du Chief Commercial Officer Farid Faraidooni were present at the launch which was fully packed with local and foreign media.
The Nokia Lumia 920 is the flagship Windows Phone 8 smartphone, including Arabic language capabilities and the latest advances in Nokia PureView imaging innovation.
“At the beginning of last year Nokia outlined a new smartphone strategy to deliver devices that not only surpass their predecessors but revolutionize the industry. We are now proud to stand here and present to you the most innovative device in the history of Nokia, embodying the height of technology, design and user-experience,” Tom Farrell, Vice President, Nokia Middle East said yesterday during the event.
“The Middle East is one of the top key markets for Nokia and continues to be strongly committed to this region. This is testament to UAE and Saudi Arabia being among the six global markets for Nokia to introduce the new Lumia range with Arabic language capabilities with strong operator offerings and retail presence. The availability of a user interface in the local language combined with strong operator offerings are two key elements in satisfying demands of consumers from the region. We are confident that the most innovative smartphone — the Lumia 920 will be a milestone for the company as a whole,” Farell added.
Al-Ghobaini said that Mobily has entered into a historical exclusive partnership with Nokia as its exclusive operator partner in the Kingdom.
“This is a strategic partnership and we hope that we would be able to give our subscribers an enhanced services with the new features in the smartphone launched today,” he added.
Al-Ghobaini pointed out that Mobily has the largest traffic in the region, it is one of the top five mobile operators to enjoy such a record of traffic in the globe, he said, adding that it enjoys a data traffic of 300 tetrabytes per day.
Mandar Bhide, general manager of Nokia Saudi Arabia said the Nokia Lumia 920 comes in yellow, red, grey, white and black. The Nokia Lumia 820 comes in red, yellow, grey, cyan, purple, white and black. Both phones will be available at all the leading electronic retail outlets in the country and will be priced at: Lumia 920 SR 2,499, and Lumia 820 SR 1,899. These products will be available in the Kingdom from Nov. 23.
Using advanced floating lens technology, the camera in the Nokia Lumia 920 is able to take in five times more light than competing smartphones without using flash, making it possible to capture clear, bright pictures and video indoors and at night.
Nokia PureView technology continues to deliver cutting-edge technology to make it possible for a smartphone camera to take the kind of images usually only seen on a standalone SLR camera. With the Nokia Lumia 920 it is now possible to shoot pictures and video at home, outdoors, in a restaurant or even at night, and come out with professional-looking results.
The Nokia Lumia 920 also comes with Nokia City Lens, the latest addition to the Nokia location suite. By pointing the camera at a city street, City Lens overlays information about restaurants, shops, hotels and more on the surfaces of buildings, for the most intuitive way to explore surroundings.


SoftBank’s Son says Japan is ‘stupid’ to disallow ride-sharing

Updated 19 July 2018
0

SoftBank’s Son says Japan is ‘stupid’ to disallow ride-sharing

  • ‘Ride-sharing is prohibited by law in Japan. I can’t believe there is still such a stupid country’
  • SoftBank and its nearly $100 billion Vision Fund have invested in ride-sharing firms Uber, Didi, Ola and Grab, as well as in other technology companies

TOKYO: SoftBank Group Corp. Chief Executive Masayoshi Son blasted Japan on Thursday for not allowing ride-sharing services, calling it “stupid” and saying the country was lagging overseas rivals in areas such as artificial intelligence (AI).
“Ride-sharing is prohibited by law in Japan. I can’t believe there is still such a stupid country,” Son said at an annual company event aimed at customers and suppliers.
The comments reflect Son’s frustration with Japan where he built SoftBank’s domestic telecoms business, the cash engine that has powered his investments. The group has, however, focused its growing range of technology investments overseas.
Son has also been highly critical of the government previously when SoftBank was still a fledgling telecoms service trying to break up a cozy duopoly in Japan.
“A country that gives up on the future has no future,” Son told attendees at the SoftBank World event, saying Japanese business is lagging behind countries such as the United States and China in employing AI.
Japan outlaws non-professional drivers from transporting paying customers on safety grounds and the country’s taxi industry lobby has vigorously opposed deregulation.
Its strict rules have confined ride-sharing firms to providing limited services, with SoftBank and China’s Didi Chuxing saying on Thursday they will trial a taxi-hailing service — matching users to pre-existing taxi operators — in Osaka beginning autumn of 2019. Uber is also piloting a taxi-hailing service.
When asked for a response to Son’s comments, a spokesman for the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and Transport said that an issue with ride-sharing services was that while the driver was in charge of transporting passengers, it was unclear who was in charge of maintenance and operation.
“The ministry believes that offering these services for a fee poses problems from the points of both safety and user protection, and careful consideration is necessary,” he said.
Ride-sharing is not the only service in Japan feeling the impact of government restrictions. Strict new rules on home-sharing came into force last month that have radically reduced the number of lettings on sites such as Airbnb Inc.
The curbs on Japan’s nascent sharing economy come despite a rapid rise in the number of inbound tourists likely to access such sharing services, and at a time when Japan is wanting to show its international face ahead of hosting the Rugby World Cup next year and the Summer Olympics in 2020.
While Son, an ethnic Korean born in Japan, has at times criticized the Japanese government, he can also be politically suave. He has praised US President Donald Trump with warm words and pledged to invest billions of dollars and create thousands of jobs in the United States.
SoftBank and its nearly $100 billion Vision Fund have invested in ride-sharing firms Uber Technologies Inc, Didi, India’s Ola and Southeast Asia’s Grab, as well as in other technology companies.
The event on Thursday saw presentations from executives at portfolio companies including Didi, General Motors’ autonomous vehicle unit Cruise and India digital payments firm Paytm E-Commerce Pvt Ltd.
Artificial intelligence is the common thread linking these companies, Son said, with that technology in the future able drive vehicles, diagnose diseases and power financial services.