Has Britain’s lost king been found?

Updated 04 February 2013
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Has Britain’s lost king been found?

LONDON: Today, scientists will announce the results of tests conducted to determine whether a battle-scarred skeleton found under a municipal parking lot in central England belongs to 15th-century King Richard III, the last British monarch to die in combat.
The University of Leicester, which is leading the search, refuses to speculate on what the announcement will say. But archaeologists, historians and local tourism officials are all hoping for confirmation that the monarch’s long-lost remains have been located.
So are the king’s fans in the Richard III Society, set up to re-evaluate the reputation of a reviled monarch. Richard was immortalized in a play by William Shakespeare as a hunchbacked usurper who left a trail of bodies — including those of his two young nephews, murdered in the Tower of London — on his way to the throne.
“It will be a whole new era for Richard III,” the society’s Lynda Pidgeon said. “It’s certainly going to spark a lot more interest. Hopefully people will have a more open mind toward Richard.”
Richard III remains an enigma — villain to many, hero to some. He ruled England between 1483 and 1485, during the decades-long tussle over the throne known as the Wars of the Roses. His brief reign saw liberal reforms including introduction of the right to bail and the lifting of restrictions on books and printing presses.
His rule was challenged, and he was defeated and killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field by the army of Henry Tudor, who took the throne as King Henry VII.
For centuries, the location of Richard’s body has been unknown. Records say he was buried by the Franciscan monks of Grey Friars at their church in Leicester, 100 miles (160 kilometers) north of London. The church was closed and dismantled after King Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries in 1538, and its location eventually was forgotten.
Then, last September, archaeologists searching for Richard dug up the skeleton of an adult male who appeared to have died in battle. There were signs of trauma to the skull, perhaps from a bladed instrument, and a barbed metal arrowhead was found between vertebrae of the upper back.
The remains also displayed signs of scoliosis, which is a form of spinal curvature, consistent with contemporary accounts of Richard’s appearance — though not with Shakespeare’s description of him as “deform’d, unfinished,” hunchback.
The university has said the findings amount to “strong circumstantial evidence” that the remains are Richard’s.



Since the discovery, researchers have been conducting scientific tests, including radiocarbon dating to determine the skeleton’s age. They also have compared its DNA with samples taken from a London cabinet-maker identified as a 17th great-grand-nephew of the king’s elder sister.


Meghan Markle’s nephew caught with knife blames Trump: report

Updated 28 min ago
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Meghan Markle’s nephew caught with knife blames Trump: report

LONDON: Tyler Dooley, nephew of Britain’s newest royal Meghan Markle, took a knife to a London nightclub and then blamed Donald Trump’s warnings about the dangers of the British capital, The Sun reported on Monday.
The daily said Dooley, 25, a cannabis farmer who was not invited to the royal wedding in Windsor, handed the four-inch blade to a bouncer outside the club in Kingston, southwest London.
London’s Metropolitan Police did not name Dooley but confirmed they were called by security to the club “after a man openly declared he had a knife as he attempted to enter the club.”
The incident happened just hours after Saturday’s wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan.
“When officers arrived at 01.55 hrs enquiries led them to a hotel in Kingston and two men in their 20s were spoken to by officers in connection with the incident.
“One of the men also voluntarily surrendered a noxious spray. Both men, who were visitors to the UK, were warned about their actions,” the statement said.
“Neither was arrested, no further action was taken and enquiries are complete,” it added.
It is illegal to carry any knife in a public place in England except for folding pocket knives with blades measuring three inches (7.62 centimeters) or less.
Police commander Sally Benatar was quoted in the statement as saying: “The items were handed over voluntarily and there was no ongoing risk so the investigation was closed with warnings given.”
The Sun quoted Dooley as telling someone outside the club: “I just brought it because Donald Trump said London was like a warzone. I had it for protection.”
When contacted by a Sun reporter, the paper said Dooley “hid inside a bin cupboard” at his hotel.
Dooley flew into London last week with his brother and mother, the ex-wife of Markle’s half-brother Thomas, who was also not invited to the nuptials.
The run-up to the royal wedding was overshadowed by the media circus surrounding Markle’s family.
Her father pulled out at the last minute after getting caught up in a paparazzi scandal and then undergoing a heart operation while her mother was the only family member to attend.
Trump has stirred controversy with repeated references to security issues in Britain.
In a speech at the National Rifle Association in Texas this month, he talked about knife crime in London, comparing a hospital in the city to a “war zone.”
Knife-related crimes rose by 23 percent in London last year and a spate of stabbings and shootings have left more than 50 people dead this year.