Saudi hip-hop band ‘Run Junxion’ releases #ShowNAwe

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Updated 28 August 2014
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Saudi hip-hop band ‘Run Junxion’ releases #ShowNAwe

Hip-Hop in Saudi Arabia is always on the move despite the difficulties facing the artists with regards to a venue to perform or when it comes to the perception of the people on this art-form/culture. Releasing albums can be challenging but things are slowly happening for local artists in Saudi Arabia; they will only improve with the support of the people and the continuous hard work of the artists.
Run Junxion, a Jeddah-based Hip-Hop group is a family even though they come from different parts of the world. The artists are from Syria, Saudi Arabia, Canada, America, Indonesia and Eritrea. But they have succeeded in using their differences to unite under one group.
On Friday Aug. 15, 2014 they officially released their 2nd album to date calling it “Shock N Awe” in an event that featured many local artists and community members who enjoyed a thorough listen to the album and even got some “live” performances from the artists. The Junxion group is considered “hardcore”; they are lyrically strong not to mention that the album was fully produced by local artists, which in my opinion is a huge step in advancing the Hip-Hop scene in Saudi Arabia. The event also had Qusai “Don Legend” Kheder as a guest; he has been supportive of the underground Hip-Hop scene in Saudi Arabia and had some good things to say when asked about his thoughts on the album launch. “I have been waiting for this!” Qusai said hyping up everybody with his hosting skills. He went on to say, “We need the artists to keep releasing tracks. I am proud of these guys that I call brothers!” The event also included a “FREE” distribution of the CD along with T-shirts for the group. It is important also to make mention of the sponsors who support these local artists. For this particular event, it was G-SHOCK and the Printing company ‘EKTIMAL” that helped make it a reality.
Arab News had a quick Q/A with Tim Granite, one of the members of Run Junxion and here’s what he had to say about the event:-

Arab News: What is the initial feedback on the album?
Tim Granite: The initial feedback is good. Of course, nothing is ever perfect and we constantly strive to improve. We want to thank everyone that liked, shared, and listened to our music. We encourage feedback and are curious of our fans’ thoughts on the album too.

AN: In your opinion, what is needed to see more album launches for local hip-hop artists in Saudi?
TG: Venues. Venues and Venues. Then more recording. More Work. Performance is a vital component and we wish that the entire scene had more of it. That said, we have more events in the pipeline coming up.

AN: What are some of the messages you are discussing in this album?
TG: The message will change from song to song and rapper to rapper; but perhaps the underlying theme is always a reflection of our lives in the Middle East. We are reporters after all, so themes can vary from brotherhood, the struggle of oppressed people, to lighter topics as well. As our producers’ music changes so do the rappers. So the topics can be as ever changing as the emotions that music inspires.
You can support Run Junxion and listen to their album “Shock N Awe” right HERE:
https://soundcloud.com/runjunxion/sets/shocknawe

Email: [email protected]


The Royal Wedding’s ‘zaghrata’ mystery — who was ‘ululating’ as Harry and Meghan left the chapel?

Updated 21 May 2018
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The Royal Wedding’s ‘zaghrata’ mystery — who was ‘ululating’ as Harry and Meghan left the chapel?

LONDON: As the dust settles on the weekend’s royal wedding extravaganza, Arab interest has switched from speculation over Meghan Markle’s dress to a more pressing mystery — who was ululating as the couple emerged from the chapel?
The high-pitched celebratory noise traditionally reserved for major celebrations in the Middle East were clearly audible as the newly weds paused at the top of the steps outside St. George’s Chapel in Windsor on Saturday. They again rang out as the couple descended the steps into the sunshine and the welcoming embrace of the crowds.
Was there an Arab guest in the crowd expressing their excitement for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex in their own inimitable fashion?
The UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office tweeted a video on their Arabic account of the supposed ululations, saying: “Maybe you can hear the ‘Zaghrata’ at the moment Harry and Meghan leave the church after the wedding?”


Zaghrata is a form of ululation practiced in the region.
Rima Maktabi - London bureau chief at the Al Arabiya News Channel, who was covering the wedding - told Arab News: “I heard it first when Harry went into the church and then when Meghan went inside, I didn’t understand what it was.
“The commentators were saying that they heard ‘international sounds’, and then as they came out, it was clear.”
However, the Arab claim to be the source of ululation is facing a challenge from a grandmother from Lesotho who told British media that Harry had pointed out to her and smiled as she made the noise.
Malineo Motsephe, 70, traveled from the African nation for the wedding, having met Harry through her work with one of his charities.
Ululating, it turns out, is as common a cultural phenomenon in parts of Africa as it is in the Arab world.