Michael Moore invades Toronto film festival

Updated 12 September 2015
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Michael Moore invades Toronto film festival

OTTAWA: Provocateur Michael Moore is back after a six-year absence with a new documentary film, “Where to Invade Next,” pitching once again socialist ideals put to the test abroad to his fellow countrymen.
The film premiered at the Toronto film festival.
Based on its title, it was initially thought to be an indictment of America’s military zeal.
But the movie actually delves very little into US military misadventures abroad.
Instead, Moore uses the term “invasion” to mean plundering other nations’ notions of happy workers, good education, humane prisons and empowered women.
He then presents these as examples of how life should be in the United States.
“I hope nobody will be mad at me, and (audiences will) appreciate the prankish nature of it all,” he told The Hollywood Reporter.
“All the countries that don’t spend 60 percent of their economy on so-called defense, spend the money on their people.
“So in a way, the perpetual war, the military industrial complex has resulted in the America we now have where we are not number one in probably anything anymore.”
The Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker places himself in the action, as a pseudo conqueror who plants the American flag wherever he goes, baffling onlookers.
The film is unlikely to win over Moore’s detractors but got a few laughs from Toronto audiences.
The real rub, however, comes at the end, when Moore reveals that the ideas implemented by these countries originally came from America, but never really took off there — such as an equal-rights amendment to Tunisia’s constitution.
“Where To Invade Next” is Moore’s first film since “Capitalism: A Love Story” in 2009 in which he assesses a culture of greed on Wall Street that led to the global financial crisis.


Personality on the morning commute: Australia’s emoji license plates

Updated 21 February 2019
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Personality on the morning commute: Australia’s emoji license plates

  • Queensland's largest automotive organization and some residents welcomed the digital addition
  • But some think it is costly and could attract unwanted attention
BRISBANE, Australia: Motorists in northeastern Australia can soon have their personality permanently stamped on their vehicles with the option of an emoji added to their license plates.
It will be positive vibes only on the morning commute after a Queensland firm announced that from March drivers can add the smiling, winking, laughing out loud, heart-eyed and sunglasses emoji to their plates.
The state’s largest automotive organization has welcomed the digital addition.
“For quite some time we’ve seen you can support your favorite team or town with a symbol on your number plate and using an emoji is no different,” Royal Automobile Club of Queensland spokesperson Rebecca Michaels told AFP.
Queensland resident Laura McKee has already put her order in for the new look plates.
“It’s a bit of fun, if this brightens up someone’s day while their stuck in traffic, then so be it,” she told AFP.
With a cost of between Aus$100 ($70) and $500 per plate, Queensland local Aroha Liebhart isn’t a fan, and thinks the emojis could attract unwanted attention.
“The cost pushes them out of reach for so many people, no one I know will be purchasing them when they’re so expensive,” she told AFP.
“I live in a high crime area, I do believe this will entice people to target the cars who do have them.”
But resident Mark Edwards wants to see more options for drivers, to better express a driver’s changing moods.
“They should be interchangeable so when you’re tired you can warn drivers, or when you’re a little angry you can swap them over,” he told AFP.