Did Adele steal Ahmet Kaya’s Kurdish song?

Updated 07 December 2015

Did Adele steal Ahmet Kaya’s Kurdish song?

ISTANBUL: British pop star Adele has been accused of plagiarism by Turkish music lovers, who say one of the tracks on her latest album is a rip-off of a song by an iconic Kurdish musician.
Adele’s Turkish critics say “Million Years Ago,” track number nine on her album “25,” bears an unmistakable resemblance to a tune by Ahmet Kaya called “Acilara Tutunmak” (“Clinging to Pain“), which was recorded in 1985.
The song’s release has created a storm on social media in Turkey, with some users accusing the 27-year performer of “stealing” the melancholic tune from Kaya, who died in France in exile 15 years ago.
“Adele has stolen a song from us,” one user named Esra Nur Aydogan wrote on Twitter, sharing a picture of a man hanging a Turkish flag on his balcony in protest.
Kaya’s wife, Gulten Kaya, also weighed in, saying it was unlikely for a global star like Adele to do such a thing.
“However, if she consciously did it, then it would be theft,” she told Turkish daily Posta.
Adele’s third studio album has sold millions of copies in both Britain and the US, smashing records on either side of the Atlantic.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.