Did Adele steal Ahmet Kaya’s Kurdish song?

Updated 07 December 2015
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Did Adele steal Ahmet Kaya’s Kurdish song?

ISTANBUL: British pop star Adele has been accused of plagiarism by Turkish music lovers, who say one of the tracks on her latest album is a rip-off of a song by an iconic Kurdish musician.
Adele’s Turkish critics say “Million Years Ago,” track number nine on her album “25,” bears an unmistakable resemblance to a tune by Ahmet Kaya called “Acilara Tutunmak” (“Clinging to Pain“), which was recorded in 1985.
The song’s release has created a storm on social media in Turkey, with some users accusing the 27-year performer of “stealing” the melancholic tune from Kaya, who died in France in exile 15 years ago.
“Adele has stolen a song from us,” one user named Esra Nur Aydogan wrote on Twitter, sharing a picture of a man hanging a Turkish flag on his balcony in protest.
Kaya’s wife, Gulten Kaya, also weighed in, saying it was unlikely for a global star like Adele to do such a thing.
“However, if she consciously did it, then it would be theft,” she told Turkish daily Posta.
Adele’s third studio album has sold millions of copies in both Britain and the US, smashing records on either side of the Atlantic.


Rake news: Social media ablaze on Trump’s forest remarks for Finland

Updated 19 November 2018
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Rake news: Social media ablaze on Trump’s forest remarks for Finland

  • US President Donald Trump claimed the forest-covered nation prevents wildfires by raking its forest floors
  • Raking-related terms were among the most popular Twitter hashtags and Google searches in the Nordic nation

HELSINKI: Social media in Finland was ablaze with bemused comments on Monday after US President Donald Trump claimed the forest-covered nation prevents wildfires by raking its forest floors.
Speaking to reporters during the weekend while in California to see the impact of devastating forest fires, the US president again blamed forest management, but said Finland had the answer.
Trump cited the Finnish president as telling him Finns “spend a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things (in the forest), and they don’t have any problem.”
However the Nordic country’s president, Sauli Niinisto, told the Ilta-Sanomat newspaper on Sunday that he had no recollection of raking being mentioned when the pair met in Paris a week ago.
“I told him that Finland is a country covered in forests, but we also have a good warning system and network,” the president said.
Finnish social media users were quick to pile in, describing Trump’s comments as “rake news” and posting pictures of themselves brandishing the garden implement.
By late Sunday, raking-related terms were among the most popular Twitter hashtags and Google searches in the Nordic nation which is 72 percent covered by forests, predominantly of pine, birch and fir.
Meanwhile Yrjo Niskanen, head of emergency preparedness at Finland’s national forest center, said the US president may have been referring to the practice of removing branches and loose material left in the forest after logging.
But he pointed out that this is not done with a rake — and the wood is collected for energy production.
“I’ve never thought before that it could be removed because of the fire risk, that’s not mentioned in any forestry manuals. It’s taken away purely for business reasons,” Niskanen told the Iltalehti newspaper.