Saudi Arabia signs pact to protect dugong

Updated 06 March 2013
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Saudi Arabia signs pact to protect dugong

Saudi Arabia has signed an international pact to protect the dugong, a herbivorous marine mammal that used to have a constant presence on coastlines around the world, including the the coastal waters of the Kingdom and the Gulf region, but whose numbers are now on the decline.
Mohammad Saud Sulayem, adviser on International Cooperation at the Saudi Wildlife Authority (SWA), confirmed yesterday his country’s support toward the protection of dugongs, which have been hunted for its meat and oil in different countries for several centuries.
The MOU was signed by Sulayem on behalf of Prince Bandar bin Saud bin Mohammad Al-Saud, President of SWA, at a ceremony held in the UNEP/CMS Office in Abu Dhabi and attended by Mubarak Salem, Director of Western Region, UAE Ministry of Environment and Water.
By signing this MoU (Dugong MOU), Saudi Arabia has joined 25 other signatories to the Memorandum of Understanding on the Conservation and Management of Dugongs and their Habitats throughout their Range.
Dugongs are large herbivorous animals, feeding predominantly on seagrass, and play a significant ecological role in the functioning of coastal ecosystems. The range of the dugong spans at least 48 countries and an estimated 140,000 kms of coastline, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
These animals are threatened by a range of harmful impacts, including drowning following incidental capture in fishing nets, loss or degradation of habitat through coastal development and strikes by vessels.
It is not clear how many dugongs remain in the coastal waters of Saudi Arabia and the Gulf region.


Boris Becker denies claims diplomatic passport is ‘fake’

Former German tennis player Boris Becker. (AFP)
Updated 23 June 2018
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Boris Becker denies claims diplomatic passport is ‘fake’

  • Lawyers for the three-time Wimbledon champion lodged a claim in the High Court in Britain saying that he had been appointed a sports attache for the CAR to the European Union (EU) in April
  • Becker shook up the tennis world at Wimbledon in 1985 when, as an unseeded player, he became the then youngest-ever male Grand Slam champion at the age of 17

LONDON: Tennis legend Boris Becker on Friday insisted that his Central African Republic diplomatic passport, which he claims entitles him to immunity in bankruptcy proceedings, was real despite the country’s leaders calling it a “fake.”
“I have received this passport from the ambassador, I have spoken to the president on many occasions, it was an official inauguration,” the German star told BBC’s Andrew Marr.
“I believe the documents they are giving me must be right.”
Lawyers for the three-time Wimbledon champion lodged a claim in the High Court in Britain saying that he had been appointed a sports attache for the CAR to the European Union (EU) in April.
This, they argued, granted him immunity under the 1961 Vienna Diplomatic Convention on Diplomatic Relations from bankruptcy proceedings over failure to pay a long-standing debt in Britain.
Bur CAR leaders say the document’s serial number corresponded to one of a batch of “new passports that were stolen in 2014.”
In April, the 50-year-old former tennis star tweeted a picture of himself shaking hands with CAR President Faustin-Archange Touadera at a meeting in Brussels.
Becker told Marr he was “very happy anytime soon to visit Bangui, the capital and to speak to the people, personally about how we can move forward and how can we resolve this misunderstanding.”
Becker shook up the tennis world at Wimbledon in 1985 when, as an unseeded player, he became the then youngest-ever male Grand Slam champion at the age of 17, defending the trophy the following year.
He went on to enjoy a glittering career and amassed more than $25 million (21.65 million euros) in prize money.