Pakistan’s Malala has successful surgery: doctors

Updated 04 February 2013
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Pakistan’s Malala has successful surgery: doctors

LONDON: British doctors said Sunday that Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taleban as punishment for campaigning for girls’ education, has had successful surgery on her skull.
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in the central English city of Birmingham said the 15-year-old had undergone two operations on Saturday to insert a titanium plate into her skull and fit an electronic device in her ear.
In an attack that shocked the world, Malala was shot by a Taleban gunman at point-blank range as her schoolbus traveled through Pakistan’s Swat Valley on October 9.
She was flown to Britain days later for treatment to the specialist hospital, which also treats British soldiers wounded in Afghanistan.
Malala, who has become a global symbol of the campaign for girls’ right to an education, was nominated Friday for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize.
A hospital spokeswoman said the schoolgirl’s medical team were “very pleased” with her progress following five hours of surgery.
“Both operations were a success and Malala is now recovering in hospital,” the spokeswoman said.
“Her condition is described as stable and her medical team are very pleased with the progress she has made so far. She is awake and talking to staff and members of her family.”
At a press conference on Wednesday giving details of the surgery, Malala’s doctors said the custom-made titanium plate would protect her brain by covering the hole left in her head by the bullet.
Doctors say the bullet grazed Malala’s brain, coming within centimeters (inches) of killing her, and traveled through her head and neck before lodging in her left shoulder.
The attack left her completely deaf in her left ear but surgeons said a cochlear implant inserted on Saturday should help her hearing return to near-normal levels within 18 months.
The hospital’s medical director Dave Rosser told Wednesday’s press conference that Malala was a “remarkable young lady” who was determined to continue speaking out for girls’ right to education despite her ordeal.
Malala first rose to prominence aged 11 with a blog for the BBC’s Urdu-language service charting her life in Swat under the Taleban.
The Nobel Peace Prize will be announced in early October and will be bestowed at a formal ceremony in Oslo on December 10.


Corbyn: Labour government would quickly recognize Palestine

Updated 22 June 2018
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Corbyn: Labour government would quickly recognize Palestine

  • British opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn said Friday that a government under his leadership would recognize a Palestinian state "very early on" and push hard for a political solution to the Syrian civil war.
  • Corbyn spoke during his first international trip outside Europe since he was elected Labour Party leader in 2015.

ZAATARI REFUGEE CAMP, Jordan: British opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn said Friday that a government under his leadership would recognize a Palestinian state "very early on" and push hard for a political solution to the Syrian civil war.
Corbyn spoke during his first international trip outside Europe since he was elected Labour Party leader in 2015.
On Friday, he toured Zaatari, Jordan's largest camp for Syrian refugees. On Saturday, he is to visit a decades-old camp for Palestinians uprooted during Arab-Israeli wars.
In Zaatari, he walked through the camp market, lined by hundreds of stalls, where he sampled falafel and chatted with a sweets vendor who told him his dream is to return to Syria as soon as possible. Corbyn also inspected a sprawling solar power installation that provides about 12 hours a day of electricity to the camp's 80,000 residents.
Labour under Corbyn gained parliament seats, but narrowly lost to Prime Minister Theresa May's Conservative Party in 2017 snap elections.
Opinion polling suggests the two parties are neck and neck. Britain is not scheduled to have another election until 2022, but there could be an early vote if May's fragile minority government suffers a major defeat in Parliament.
With his visit to Jordan, Corbyn appeared to be burnishing his foreign policy credentials.
Taking questions from reporters in the Zaatari market, he said that a Labour government would "work very, very hard to regenerate the peace process" in Syria. He said two parallel sets of talks about a solution for Syria would need to "come together," but did not offer specifics.
Without a solution in Syria, "the conflict will continue, more people will die in Syria and many many more will go to refugee camps, either here in Jordan or come to Europe or elsewhere," he told The Associated Press.