Pearl found inside oyster for headache cure

Updated 27 February 2013
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Pearl found inside oyster for headache cure

CORNWALL, NEWQUAY: A pearl has been found inside an oyster that was being used as part of a cure of a headache. Seafood lover James Humphries, 34, bought two oysters from his local fishmongers, E Rawle & Co, in order to cure his headache. While chewing on one of the molluscs, he felt a small lump between his teeth, reports The Mirror.
He revealed: "I thought a filling had fallen out. It was only when I spat it out that I discovered it was a pearl. "It's small, but perfectly formed and I absolutely love it." It is very unusual for pearls to be found in Pacific oysters, like the one Humphries found. They are usually found in pearl oysters.
Fishmonger Gareth Horner, whose grandfather set up E Rawle & Co in 1936, said: "I've been here for 30 years and sold thousands of oysters, but I've never seen a pearl come out of one. "My dad has been in the business even longer and he's never heard of it either."


One case of H5N8 avian flu recorded in Al-Kharj

Updated 17 April 2018
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One case of H5N8 avian flu recorded in Al-Kharj

  • Bird flu strains have hit poultry flocks in a number of countries
  • Saudi Wildlife Authority enforced a ban on the hunting of migratory birds

RIYADH: The Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture on Monday announced detection of two cases of H5N8 avian flu in Al-Kharj governorate, reported the Saudi Press Agency.
Saudi authorities are actively taking measures to contain the virus. In its daily briefing, the ministry affirmed that the number of samples collected from different parts of the Kingdom since the first case was reported reached 13, 861.
Bird flu strains have hit poultry flocks in a number of countries across the world in recent years, with some types of the disease also causing human infections and deaths. H5N8 is highly pathogenic to birds (meaning high death rates) and was first discovered in Ireland in 1983.
Since then it has been reported in numerous locations around the world. This strain, however, has not caused any human infections so far anywhere in the world.
According to an Arab News report published in January, the Saudi Wildlife Authority enforced a ban on the hunting of migratory birds to help prevent avian influenza.
The migratory birds include houbara bustards, passerines, flamingos, pelicans, cranes and turtle doves.