Pilgrims visit historic Uhud battlefield

Updated 27 September 2012
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Pilgrims visit historic Uhud battlefield

While in Madinah, pilgrims like to embark on a tour of of the many historic sites in the region. The location of the Battle of Uhud, one of the most famous battles in the Islamic history, is one such ancient site.
On Tuesday morning, more than 10 buses brought visitors to the Shuhada Uhud (Martyrs of Uhud) area that overlooks the historic battlefield.
Pilgrims of different nationalities and ages toured the area that houses the martyrs’ graves.
“It’s the first time that I am visiting this historical site that witnessed the Muslims’ sacrifices for the sake of spreading the religion,” said Shshid Muhammad Akhtar from Pakistan, one of the the visitors who stood on the Rumat Mountain (arrow shooters’ mountain) with his camera.
Another Pakistani pilgrim, Muhammad Waqar, said he read and heard a lot about the historic battle but it is the first time for him to stand on the ‘shooters’ mountain.” Under the supervision of the chairman of the Madinah Haj Committee and the Madinah Gov. Prince Abdulaziz bin Majed bin Abdulaziz, all relevant authorities and private bodies are performing their duties in serving pilgrims arriving in the Prophet’s City around the clock. So far 145,484 pilgrims have arrived in Madinah through Prince Muhammad Bin Abdul Aziz International Airport and through land. About 3,598 left the city.
Most pilgrims in Madinah currently are Malaysians who number 28,765; while there are 28,155 Turkish pilgrims and 25,681 Indian pilgrims, according to the Madina Haj Committee’s secretary’s report on Tuesday.
Meanwhile, Pakistan International Airlines has started running direct flights to Madinah from several Pakistani cities. Director of the company’s office in Madinah, Muhammad Shahid Hussien, said so far six flights were running and they will continue operation until Oct. 19.


Samsung receives reports of Galaxy Fold screen problems, says to investigate

Updated 18 April 2019
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Samsung receives reports of Galaxy Fold screen problems, says to investigate

  • Some tech reviewers of the Galaxy Fold said the phone malfunctioned after only a day or two of use
  • The splashy $1,980 phone resembles a conventional smartphone but opens like a book to reveal a second display

NEW YORK/SEOUL: South Korea’s Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. said it has received “a few” reports of damage to the main display of samples of its upcoming foldable smartphone and that it will investigate.
Some tech reviewers of the Galaxy Fold, a splashy $1,980 phone that opens into a tablet and that goes on sale in the United States on April 26, said the phone malfunctioned after only a day or two of use.
“We will thoroughly inspect these units in person to determine the cause of the matter,” Samsung said in a statement, noting that a limited number of early Galaxy Fold samples were provided to media for review.
The problem seems to be related to the unit’s screen either cracking or flickering, according to Twitter posts by technology journalists from Bloomberg, The Verge and CNBC who received the phone this week for review purposes.
Samsung, which has advertised the phone as “the future,” said removing a protective layer of its main display might cause damage, and that it will clearly inform customers such.
The company said it has closed pre-orders for the Galaxy Fold due to “high demand.” It told Reuters there is no change to its release schedule following the malfunction reports.
The South Korean company’s Galaxy Fold resembles a conventional smartphone but opens like a book to reveal a second display the size of a small tablet at 7.3 inches (18.5 cm).
Although Galaxy Fold and Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd’s Mate X foldable phones are not expected to be big sellers, the new designs were hailed as framing the future of smartphones this year in a field that has seen few surprises since Apple Inc. introduced the screen slab iPhone in 2007.
The problems with the new phone drew comparisons to Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 phone in 2016. Battery and design flaws in the Note 7 led to some units catching fire or exploding, forcing Samsung to recall and cancel sales of the phone. The recall wiped out nearly all of the profit in Samsung’s mobile division in the third quarter of 2016.
Samsung has said it plans to churn out at least 1 million foldable Galaxy Fold handsets globally, compared with its total estimated 300 million mobile phones it produces annually.
Reviewers of the new Galaxy Fold said they did not know what the problem was and Samsung did not provide answers.
Bloomberg reporter Mark Gurman tweeted: “The screen on my Galaxy Fold review unit is completely broken and unusable just two days in. Hard to know if this is widespread or not.”
According to Gurman’s tweets, he removed a plastic layer on the screen that was not meant to be removed and the phone malfunctioned afterwards.
Dieter Bohn, executive editor of The Verge, said that a “small bulge” appeared on the crease of the phone screen, which appeared to be something pressing from underneath the screen. Bohn said Samsung replaced his test phone but did not offer a reason for the problem.
“It is very troubling,” Bohn told Reuters, adding that he did not remove the plastic screen cover.
Steve Kovach, tech editor at CNBC.com tweeted a video of half of his phone’s screen flickering after using it for just a day.