Pink boxing gloves to fight cancer

Updated 24 October 2012
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Pink boxing gloves to fight cancer

Loft, a Saudi team founded by a photographer, filmmaker and art director, has launched a campaign to spread an awareness of breast cancer this month. The team is a creative hub of tri-disciplined services: Design, Photography, and Film. They have recently introduced a new service to their bouquet. They partnered up with a social media consultancy to provide their clients with expert social media strategies.
“We give equal importance to all three disciplines. We love working with local, upcoming brands or talents,” said Nada Hakeem, co-founder. “We also like to work with established clients who want a new and fresh take on their creative needs,” she added.
The Loft founders are enthusiastic and active young women, they believe everyone owes their community, and this is why they took the opportunity during the month of October, being an internationally celebrated month for breast cancer awareness, to raise awareness about the topic in their own creative way, as part of their corporate social responsibility.
“The idea started with a design campaign: a visual and the slogan ‘Let’s Fight’. Soon we thought to extend it into a photo and video shoot,” said Hakeem. “The idea is that everyone that participates, and pays a fee of SR 50, gets their picture and video taken while posing in a fighting stance with a pair of pink boxing gloves,” she added.
The project has around one hundred participants; some of them supported the initiative by sharing pictures on social media.
“We aim to inject positive energy into our audience, and positive change into our community. We also aim to encourage similar creative social initiatives, in any realm,” said Hakeem. “We raised a satisfactory amount of money, we are very thankful to everyone that participated. The money is going to the Zahra Breast Cancer Association,” she added.
The artists are always interested in participating in cause initiatives. They had previously done the “Erham Al-Amel Al-Sayem” campaign, which is Arabic for “Have Mercy upon Fasting Workers”, during the month of Ramadan, and they are looking into an ongoing recycling initiative.
The campaign received great feedback through social media, where people started sharing the pictures and commenting on them. “Everyone who participated in this campaign came with a great load of energy,” said Hakeem. “We got very positive feedback, and we guarantee everyone will be even happier with the picture and video release, so stay tuned,” she added.

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Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

Updated 21 June 2018
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Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

  • The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum.
  • Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events.

ATHENS: Hymns sung to the Greek gods thousands of years ago resonated from ancient musical instruments in Athens on Thursday, transporting a transfixed audience to antiquity.
The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum as part of World Music Day celebrations.
A family of musicians, Lyravlos have recreated exact replicas of the ancient instruments from natural materials including animal shells, bones, hides and horns.
Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events. Today only some 60 written scores of ancient Greek music have survived, said Lyravlos member Michael Stefos.
Stefos said they interpret them as best they can, relying on the accuracy of their recreated instruments.
“Joking aside, ancient CDs have never been found,” he said.
Their performance included a hymn to the god Apollo, pieces played at the musical festival of the ancient Pythian Games in Delphi and during wine-laden rituals to the god Dionysus.
Michael’s father Panayiotis Stefos, who heads the group, travels to museums at home and abroad studying ancient Greek antiquities and texts in order to recreate the instruments.
“Usually each instrument has a different sound. It is not something you can make on a computer, it will not be a carbon copy,” said Stefos.
The difference with modern day instruments?
“If someone holds it in their arms and starts playing, after a few minutes they don’t want to let it go, because it vibrates and pulsates with your body,” he said.
French tourist Helene Piaget, who watched the performance, said it was “inspiring.”
“One sees them on statues, on reliefs, and you can’t imagine what they might sound like,” she said.
World Music Day is an annual celebration that takes place on the summer solstice.