Pirates kidnap five Indians off Nigeria

Updated 19 December 2012
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Pirates kidnap five Indians off Nigeria

LAGOS: Armed pirates who stormed and ransacked an oil tanker off Nigeria have kidnapped five Indian crew members, said a statement yesterday from the operators of the ship.
Medallion Marine, which operates the SP Brussels tanker, said their vessel was boarded on Monday by “heavily armed pirates” about 40 miles (65 kilometers) off the coast of the oil-producing Niger Delta region.
“The pirates ransacked the vessel for personal belongings and took five crew members with them on their departure,” said spokesman Martin Baxendale. He later told AFP those taken were Indian nationals.
The statement said the remaining crew were safe and that the tanker had arrived at the port of Lagos in Nigeria’s economic capital.
“Everything possible is being done to ensure the safe return of those crewmembers taken,” it further said.
The company added that it was working closely with local authorities, but Nigeria’s navy was not immediately available to comment on whether any rescue operation had been launched.
Kidnappings for ransom, often targeting expatriate oil workers, have been a common occurrence in the Niger Delta but a 2009 amnesty deal with armed groups in the region led to a drop in the such attacks.
The International Maritime Bureau, a branch of the International Chamber of Commerce funded by ship owners, has however described the Gulf of Guinea, which includes the waters off Benin, Nigeria and Togo as an emerging piracy hub.
The IMB said attacks in the area have grown increasingly violent and that theft of crude oil has often been the goal of the assailants.
In October, six Russians and one Estonian sailor working on a vessel used to tow oil rigs were kidnapped by armed men who raided their vessel. When the sailors were released two weeks later, both their employer and Nigerian authorities declined to comment on whether a ransom was paid, the typical practice in such cases.
In August, four foreign oil workers — Indonesian, Iranian, Malaysian and Thai nationals — were kidnapped when unknown gunmen attacked their vessel in the Gulf of Guinea. They were also later released.
In the early hours of Aug. 4, suspected sea pirates stormed a barge and opened fire, killing two Nigerian sailors and injuring two others.
Nigeria is Africa’s largest oil producer and the continent’s most populous nation with 160 million people. Separately, at least 27 people on a truck laden with cattle and sheep have drowned after the vehicle plunged into a river in northwest Nigeria, a road safety official said yesterday. The accident occurred on Monday in a remote part of Sokoto state and details of the disaster did not immediately emerge.
Umar Aliyu of the state’s road safety commission said the truck driver and his assistant were among the 20 people who survived the crash.
“There was an accident on Monday involving a truck in which 27 people died and scores of livestock perished,” Aliyu told AFP.
He said the driver lost control of the vehicle near the village of Masallaci before it plunged into the river, blaming the crash on the high speed of travel and excessive cargo.
Nigeria, Africa’s most populous nation, has one of the worst road accident records in Africa, with poor roads, badly maintained vehicles and reckless driving conspiring to kill thousands every year.


86 people killed in central Nigeria violence: police

Updated 29 min 37 sec ago
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86 people killed in central Nigeria violence: police

  • Analysts believe it could become Nigeria’s biggest security concern, eclipsing Boko Haram’s Islamist insurgency that has left at least 20,000 dead since 2009
  • The violence — fueled by ethnic, religious and political allegiances — has killed thousands over several decades

JOS, Nigeria: Eighty-six people have been killed in an attack by suspected nomadic herders against farming communities in restive central Nigeria, police said on Sunday.
The discovery in the Barikin Ladi area of Plateau state came after days of violence apparently sparked by an attack by ethnic Berom farmers on Fulani herders on Thursday.
State police commissioner Undie Adie said a search of Berom villages in the area following clashes on Saturday found “86 persons altogether were killed.”
Adie told reporters six people were also injured and 50 houses razed. Bodies of those who died have been released to their families, he added.
The deaths are the latest in a long-running battle for land and resources that is putting President Muhammadu Buhari under pressure as elections approach next year.
The violence — fueled by ethnic, religious and political allegiances — has killed thousands over several decades.
Analysts believe it could become Nigeria’s biggest security concern, eclipsing Boko Haram’s Islamist insurgency that has left at least 20,000 dead since 2009.
The Plateau state government said it had imposed restrictions on movements in the Riyom, Barikin Ladi and Jos South areas “to avert a breakdown of law and order.”
“The curfew takes effect immediately... and movement is restricted from 6:00 p.m. (1700 GMT) to 6:00 am, except (for) those on essential duties,” said spokesman Rufus Bature.
On Sunday, ethnic Berom youths set up barricades on the Jos-Abuja highway and attacked motorists who looked “Fulani and Muslim,” according to those who escaped the violence.
Plateau state police spokesman Tyopev Terna and Major Adam Umar, from the military taskforce in the state capital, Jos, confirmed the blockade and vandalism to several cars.
There were no official reports of deaths but Baba Bala, who escaped the violence on the road, said at least six people were killed.
“I was lucky the convoy of the (Plateau) state government was passing through the scene of the attack shortly after I ran into the attackers,” he said.
“I escaped with smashed windscreens and dents on my car. I saw six dead bodies and several damaged cars.”