Pressure mounts on Israel over hunger strike of prisoners

Updated 19 February 2013
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Pressure mounts on Israel over hunger strike of prisoners

RAMALLAH: Hundreds of Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails declared a one-day fast yesterday in solidarity with four inmates whose hunger strike has fueled anti-Israel protests in the occupied West Bank.
Samer Al-Issawi, one of the four Palestinians who have been on hunger strike, has been refusing food, intermittently, for more than 200 days. His family says his health has deteriorated sharply.
The prisoners’ campaign for better conditions and against detention without trial has touched off violent protests over the past several weeks outside an Israeli military prison and in West Bank towns.
In the Gaza Strip, the Islamic Jihad group said a truce with Israel that ended eight days of fighting in November could unravel if any hunger striker died.
The Palestinian Prisoners Club, which looks after the welfare of inmates and their families, said 800 prisoners were taking part in the day-long fast.
Issawi was among 1,027 jailed Palestinians freed by Israel in 2011 in exchange for Gilad Shalit, a soldier who was abducted on the Gaza border by Hamas.
Issawi and Ayman Sharawneh, who has also been on hunger strike, are among 14 Palestinians who have been re-arrested by Israel since being released in the Shalit trade.
Ofir Gendelman, a spokesman for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, wrote on Twitter that Issawi and Sharawneh were detained “because they violated the terms of the Shalit deal by returning to illegal activities which pose a threat.”
Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat said he had been in contact with Israel and urged it to release the men. He said Egypt, which helped mediate the Shalit prisoner swap and also negotiated an end to a Palestinian mass hunger strike in Israeli jails last year, was trying to end the new protest.
Israel has defused previous long-term hunger strikes among the some 4,700 Palestinians in its jails by agreeing to release individuals or deporting them to Gaza — a prospect rejected by the four protesters, who hail from Jerusalem and the West Bank.
The Quartet of Middle East negotiators — the United States, Russia, the United Nations and European Union — have expressed concern at the hunger strike.
In a statement, France’s Foreign Ministry urged Israel “to be sensitive to the risk of a tragic outcome and to take appropriate measures as a matter of urgency.”
The statement said “administrative detention must remain an exceptional measure of limited duration and be carried out with due regard for fundamental safeguards.”
Israel holds some Palestinians in “administrative detention” based on evidence presented in a closed military court. It says the practice pre-empts militant attacks against it while keeping its counter-intelligence sources and tactics secret.


Yemen’s deputy army chief survives attempt on life

Maj. Gen. Saleh Al-Zindani
Updated 28 May 2018
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Yemen’s deputy army chief survives attempt on life

  • “This terrorist regime” in Tehran, “which supplies terrorist militias all over the world
  • Iran backs the Houthis, who seized Sanaa in 2014

ADEN: The deputy chief of Yemeni Army, Maj. Gen. Saleh Al-Zindani, survived an attempt on his life in Aden, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Sunday.
The assassination attempt took place when Al-Zindani was leaving a hospital in Aden last night. Yemeni Prime Minister Ahmed Obeid bin Daghr condemned the incident calling it a barbaric act that puts international security and stability in jeopardy.
The incident is under investigation and no group has claimed the responsibility for the incident.
The Houthi militias have wreaked havoc on the country.
Iran backs the Houthis, who seized Sanaa in 2014, prompting an Arab military coalition to intervene against the militias the following year.
Last week, Yemen’s newly appointed Foreign Minister Khalid Al-Yamani categorically said there cannot be peace in the country unless the Houthis abandon their arms.
“The internationally recognized government will not allow Iran, which backs the Houthis, to maintain a foothold in Yemen or interfere in its internal affairs,” he added.
“This terrorist regime” in Tehran, “which supplies terrorist militias all over the world, is close to collapse as a result of international and popular pressure by the Iranian people, who are suffering as their terrorist state spends billions here and there for a foolish expansionist idea,” Al-Yamani said.
“The modern and civilized world that respects international law cannot accept the existence of a state sponsor of terrorism and all subversive and terrorist militias in the region,” he added.