Prince Philip back on UK royal duty after illness

Updated 16 June 2012
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Prince Philip back on UK royal duty after illness

LONDON: Prince Philip, the husband of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth, made his first major public appearance on Saturday since a hospital stay for a bladder infection, attending the annual Trooping the Color ceremony in central London.
The Duke of Edinburgh, who turned 91 last Sunday, waved and smiled to cheering crowds gathered outside Buckingham Palace as he watched a military fly-past from the balcony of the royal residence alongside the queen and other royal family members.
Wearing a red military jacket with a blue sash and gold epaulettes, he looked alert and in good spirits during the event marking the queen’s official birthday.
His illness had overshadowed the later stages of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations earlier this month marking the 60th year of the queen’s reign, forcing him to miss a star-studded pop concert held outside the palace.
Singer Elton John, one of the concert’s performers, had joked before going on stage that the prince’s illness might have been a ruse: “He hates pop music - anything to get out of a pop concert.”
Earlier on Saturday the Prince rode with the queen in a glass coach to and from a nearby parade ground where they watched an hour-long tattoo performed by 1,600 soldiers and horse riders in traditional military uniforms.
Other royals attending the military spectacle included Prince Charles, the heir to the throne, and his son and daughter-in-law - Prince William and his wife Kate.
Philip had been taken to hospital after spending hours on a ceremonial barge in driving rain and a cold wind as part of a flotilla of 1,000 vessels on the River Thames, a highlight of the Jubilee festivities.
Royal aides said he was treated with antibiotics and made good progress during his stay in hospital.
The Greek-born former naval officer is known for his gaffes and off-the-cuff comments about groups such as the Chinese, deaf people and Australia’s Aborigines.
The longest serving consort in British history has won admirers for his charity work and loyal support to the queen. She has described him as her “strength and stay” and once said she owes him “a debt greater than he would ever claim.”

 


Rights court dismisses Breivik’s complaint about jail conditions

Breivik is serving a 21-year sentence for the July 2011 massacre of 77 people. (Lise Aaserud via Reuters)
Updated 3 min 11 sec ago
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Rights court dismisses Breivik’s complaint about jail conditions

  • Norwegian officials have repeatedly rejected allegations that Breivik is isolated, arguing that he is treated as a “VIP prisoner” and has regular contact with prison staff, his lawyer and visitors
  • Breivik has the use of three cells, each measuring more than 10 square meters and equipped with a television, computer, DVD player and gym gear

STRASBOURG: The European Court of Human Rights on Thursday dismissed a complaint by Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik over his prison conditions, ending a long-running saga that kept him in the public eye, tormenting his victims.
Breivik is serving a 21-year sentence for the July 2011 massacre of 77 people, most of them teenagers gunned down while attending a Labour Party youth camp on the small island of Utoeya.
The far-right, anti-Islam extremist took his case to the ECHR after Norway’s Supreme Court refused to hear his appeal last year against a ruling that his near-isolation in a three-room cell respected his human rights.
His lawyer argued that the prison conditions breached articles 3 and 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights: the former prohibits inhuman or degrading treatment, the latter guarantees a right to privacy and family life.
“His state (of mind) is deteriorating,” his lawyer Oystein Storrvik told AFP. “He is no longer able to study for example.”
But the court based in Strasbourg said that “its examination of the case did not reveal any violations of the Convention, and rejected the application as inadmissible for being manifestly ill-founded.”
Norwegian officials have repeatedly rejected allegations that Breivik is isolated, arguing that he is treated as a “VIP prisoner” and has regular contact with prison staff, his lawyer and visitors.
He has the use of three cells, each measuring more than 10 square meters and equipped with a television, computer, DVD player and gym gear. He has no Internet connection, however.
Survivors of the Utoeya massacre expressed satisfaction at the ruling.
“It’s a relief. We’re hoping not to hear his name again for many years to come,” Lisbeth Kristine Royneland, the head of a victims’ support group whose 18-year-old daughter was killed by Breivik, told AFP.
Writing on Twitter, a survivor of the massacre, Tore Remi Christensen, wrote: “The Breivik case is rejected in Strasbourg. Delighted. May he and all those who share his shitty message rot in hell.”
Breivik’s killing spree began on July 22, 2011, when he set off a bomb outside a government building in Oslo, killing eight people.
Disguised as a police officer and armed with a semi-automatic rifle and pistol, he then went to Utoya where the Labour Party was holding a youth camp, killing 69.
During his trial the extremist, who has changed his name to Fjotolf Hansen, repeatedly addressed the courts with Nazi salutes and complained about the cold coffee and frozen meals served in prison, among other things.
His sentence can be extended indefinitely if judges determine he remains a threat to society.