Qaddafi’s ex-PM goes on trial

Updated 12 November 2012
0

Qaddafi’s ex-PM goes on trial

TRIPOLI: Deposed Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi’s former prime minister went on trial on Monday over allegations including corruption and of ordering mass rape during the war last year.
Al Baghdadi Al-Mahmoudi could face life in jail or execution if convicted. He served as the ousted Libyan leader’s prime minister from 2006 until he fled to neighboring Tunisia around the time rebel fighters took Tripoli in August last year.
Tunisia extradited him in June, making him the first senior former Qaddafi official to be returned for trial under Libya’s transitional leadership.
Under heavy security, Mahmoudi appeared in the dock looking healthy and dressed in traditional Libyan clothing.
The judge postponed the hearing to Dec. 10 to give the prosecution and defense more time to review documents.
Former spy chief Abdullah Al-Senussi was the second former Qaddafi official to be extradited to Libya, in September, after being captured in Mauritania on a false passport.
Tripoli considers it a matter of national pride and a mark of Libya’s transformation for former Qaddafi loyalists to be tried in the country. But human rights groups question whether the justice system can meet international legal standards.


Egypt court orders one month YouTube block over Islam film

Updated 26 May 2018
0

Egypt court orders one month YouTube block over Islam film

  • A lower court had ordered the video sharing site be blocked in 2013 after it carried the video "Innocence of Muslims"

CAIRO: Egypt’s top administrative court ordered authorities Saturday to block video-sharing website YouTube in the country for a month, after a years-long appeals process over a film denigrating Islam’s Prophet Muhammad, a judicial official said.
A lower court had ordered the video sharing site be blocked in 2013 after it carried the video “Innocence of Muslims,” but the case was appealed by Egypt’s National Telecommunications Regulatory Authority and its ruling was stayed.
The 2012 amateurish film depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a buffoon and a paedophile, and sparked a wave of angry anti-American protests across the Middle East in which more than 30 people were killed.
Washington sought to keep a lid on the demonstrations by saying the controversial film was made privately with no official backing.
US officials said freedom of speech laws prevented them from stopping the production of inflammatory material.
The ruling is considered final and cannot be appealed.
As of Saturday afternoon, YouTube was still accessible in Cairo.