Renault awards its Facebook competition winner

Updated 29 November 2012
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Renault awards its Facebook competition winner

Renault Saudi Arabia recently awarded Anas Al-Taglabi, winner of its Facebook competition, which was organized by Renault Saudi Arabia. It included uploading of the most shocking picture that expresses the Shocking affordability of the Duster and reflects the contender’s surprise over the car’s incomparable attractive price. This came as part of Renault’s efforts to interact with its valued clients via unconventional ways to enable them to approach and witness the unique privileges and distinguished services provided by Renault to its clients.
Highlighting Renault›s dedication toward its clients, Divyendu Kumar, MD of Gulf Advantage Automobiles, flew in from Oman to attend the ceremony and honor the winner himself. During the ceremony held at Renault showroom in Riyadh, Kumar expressed his excitement and presented Al-Taglabi with a Bose home theater system.
The event was attended by a number of company officials, and fans who took part in the massive Facebook competition. The competition triggered more than 300 participants to join the rally of pictures and a total of 6,000 fans voted for their favorite picture. The campaign helped increase the Renault Saudi Arabia Facebook page to over 18,000 new fans.
This contest comes as a confirmation to the huge success and popularity achieved by Renault Duster in the Saudi market and the Gulf Region; and also as part of the numerous successes of Renault in the region. Since its launch in the GCC region in May 2012, Renault Duster has seen a high demand and has been extensively sought after especially in the Saudi Market.
Renault has been experiencing great success in the GCC market owing to its quality and durability when compared to its competitors. It was named the fastest growing brand in the GCC in September 2011, with growth rates exceeding 160 percent compared to the same period of 2010. It also ranks fourth among European brands in the GCC and first in Saudi Arabia.
Renault is known for its superb after-sales services, which cover most of the regions in Saudi Arabia. Renault recently opened in Riyadh its largest service center in the GCC countries.
Currently it has showrooms in Madinah, Riyadh, Taif, Jeddah, Dammam, Qatif, Al-Jawaf and Jazan, aside from its three main service centers in Riyadh, Jeddah and Dammam. The other areas of the Kingdom are covered by 11 approved service facilities in addition to 48 spareparts stores all over the Kingdom.


Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

Updated 21 June 2018
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Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

  • The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum.
  • Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events.

ATHENS: Hymns sung to the Greek gods thousands of years ago resonated from ancient musical instruments in Athens on Thursday, transporting a transfixed audience to antiquity.
The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum as part of World Music Day celebrations.
A family of musicians, Lyravlos have recreated exact replicas of the ancient instruments from natural materials including animal shells, bones, hides and horns.
Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events. Today only some 60 written scores of ancient Greek music have survived, said Lyravlos member Michael Stefos.
Stefos said they interpret them as best they can, relying on the accuracy of their recreated instruments.
“Joking aside, ancient CDs have never been found,” he said.
Their performance included a hymn to the god Apollo, pieces played at the musical festival of the ancient Pythian Games in Delphi and during wine-laden rituals to the god Dionysus.
Michael’s father Panayiotis Stefos, who heads the group, travels to museums at home and abroad studying ancient Greek antiquities and texts in order to recreate the instruments.
“Usually each instrument has a different sound. It is not something you can make on a computer, it will not be a carbon copy,” said Stefos.
The difference with modern day instruments?
“If someone holds it in their arms and starts playing, after a few minutes they don’t want to let it go, because it vibrates and pulsates with your body,” he said.
French tourist Helene Piaget, who watched the performance, said it was “inspiring.”
“One sees them on statues, on reliefs, and you can’t imagine what they might sound like,” she said.
World Music Day is an annual celebration that takes place on the summer solstice.