Renewable sources of energy

Updated 25 February 2013
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Renewable sources of energy

This is regarding the front-page story, “KSA oil can fulfill energy needs for 80 more years” (Feb. 22). While the exact economic life of oil reserves in Saudi Arabia, or elsewhere, may be debatable as such estimates are a function of a wide and complex set of assumptions, one thing beyond dispute is that oil reserves, like the other fossil fuels, are nonrenewable stocks, which will eventually exhaust.
This makes it imperative on us (as individuals as well as society) to exercise utmost care in their consumption, and instead of feeling relaxed from such news, should utilize this period to switch to more renewable and sustainable sources of energy.
In particular, we must bear in mind the following: First, these reserves were formed through a unique epoch of history that spanned millions of years, and there is no evidence to suggest that once we deplete the existing stocks, we will have more of these. Second, the existing stocks of these resources are a national endowment. As such, they belong as much to our future generations as to us.
We, therefore, have no right to be extravagant in their use, and should strive to leave as much as possible of these for them also so that they will not blame us to have plundered on what belonged to them equally. Third, these reserves are also a natural endowment and one day we will all be held accountable on how we consumed these, as Allah Almighty says in the Holy Qur’an in Surah Al-Hakim (102/8), “Then, on that Day, you shall be asked about the delight (you indulged in, in this world.)” — M. Shahid Rahim, Riyadh


Cartoon in bad taste

Updated 07 August 2017
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Cartoon in bad taste

I wish to use my “right of reply” to complain about the unfortunate caricature that appeared on Aug. 5, 2017, in your well-known newspaper. The cartoon represents President Nicolas Maduro sitting on a military tank and a hand coming out of the tank’s cannon writing on a book titled “New Constitution.” Such a caricature is offensive to my country.
What the caricature seems to imply is that President Maduro wants to rewrite a new constitution with the power of arms. This is totally false. It is immoral to give your readers such a forged image of Venezuela and its constitutionally- and democratically-elected government.
The revision of our constitution, which is among the best in the world, is mainly to reinforce it and make it more adaptable to the new times. It is not an imposition of our president; it has been backed by more than 8 million Venezuelans and has the objective of re-establishing the peace process that has been trampled by a violent opposition backed by interested foreign countries that pretend to give orders to our sovereign populace.
I fail to understand why some international media report fake news about my country, with the purpose of undermining our sovereignty, and the people of Venezuela’s absolute right to decide, in a free and independent manner, how it wants to conduct its internal affairs.
I invite your newspaper to inform about our country with the truth and the same respect that we, in Venezuela, treat to our brothers of Saudi Arabia.

Joseba Achutegui
Ambassador of Venezuela
Riyadh
Saudi Arabia