ROSSO: A different kind of Italian

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Updated 13 February 2013
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ROSSO: A different kind of Italian

Rosso is Italian for Red and it is also a modern contemporary Italian restaurant at the Four Seasons Hotel in Riyadh. The restaurant is anything but average from the décor, location to the homemade Italian dishes.
The restaurant is located on the ground floor of the hotel and is not very visible when you walk into the hotel lobby, creating a more private atmosphere for customers.
As soon as you step into the restaurant, the unique food experience begins, with an antipasti section in the center welcoming you with its various Italian delicacies.
The entire restaurant is engulfed in red, from the carpets on the floor to the dark red leather chairs and sofas that seat up to 142 diners, giving it a dramatic flare. Diners are transported further to the Italian capital with the artwork hung on the walls revealing old pictures of Rome in black and white shades and the soft Italian music in the background, livening the atmosphere.
Diners are invited to witness their favorite dishes being cooked right in front of them as the kitchen is open and the chef is within eyesight. For those who would like to host a private dinner at Rosso, the restaurant also has a private dining area that seats 16 people.
I was welcomed at the door with a friendly waiter who ushered me to my table. The chef followed suit, giving me his favorite suggestions, after ensuring I don’t have allergies to any type of food or ingredient.
Amongst the chef’s first recommendations was the Tartara D’Aragosta Con Cremino Di Patate, a cold starter, comprised of lobster tartar with potato cream; a brilliant combination. The dish was served with layers of cherry tomatoes, radish and bread cubes drizzled with olive oil and topped with raw lobster meat and black truffle. To top this delicious meal off, potato cream was served with black truffle on the side.
My next dish was a hot pot of Lasagna Pasticciata- notoriously known to be the best in town. The portion size was just right, and the lasagna itself tasted like it was cooked in an Italian housewife’s kitchen. The flavors of the minced beef, tomato sauce and the cheese tasted fresh and were cooked to perfection.
For the main dish, I had the Branzino Arrosto which is a roasted Chilean Sea Bass served with smoked eggplant, mint, sweet pepper and topped with lemon sauce. The white fish was very soft, and light and the lemon sauce complemented the dish.
Chef Marco Terranova recommends the Bisaccina Di Carne Farcita Con Mozzarella Di Bufala to Arab News readers. It is made of a veal parcel filled with buffalo mozzarella, cherry tomatoes, black olives and basil.
You should also try the Porcini E Bresaola pizza made with mozzarella cheese, porcini mushroom, air-dried beef bresaola, truffle oil and chopped black truffles.
The best part of the meal comes at the end with the Nutella Pizza; just the name alone is enough to stir your taste buds. This sinful dessert consists of two slices of dough stuffed with Nutella chocolate spread, slices of banana and a scoop of pistachio ice cream on the side. The ingredients say it all; I guarantee you will be coming back from more of this.
Rosso has a rich menu of mocktails and juices; I had the strawberry Mojito made of lime and fresh strawberry juice, crushed ice and mint leaves. You can also try the Rosso Shirley Temple, which is made oforange juice, lemon-lime carbonated beverage and grenadine syrup.
Rosso is only open for dinner so make sure to put on your smart casual outfit and enjoy a fabulous meal.
Opening hours: 7 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Expect to pay: SR250

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Gaming addiction classified as mental health disorder by WHO

Updated 18 June 2018
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Gaming addiction classified as mental health disorder by WHO

  • Addiction to video games has been recognized by World Health Organization as a mental health disorder
  • The International Classification of Diseases now covers 55,000 injuries, diseases and causes of death

GENEVA: Obsessive video gamers know how to anticipate dangers in virtual worlds. The World Health Organization says they now should be on guard for a danger in the real world: spending too much time playing.
In its latest revision to a disease classification manual, the UN health agency said Monday that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a mental health condition. The statement confirmed the fears of some parents but led critics to warn that it may risk stigmatizing too many young video players.
WHO said classifying “gaming disorder” as a separate addiction will help governments, families and health care workers be more vigilant and prepared to identify the risks. The agency and other experts were quick to note that cases of the condition are still very rare, with no more than up to 3 percent of all gamers believed to be affected.
Dr. Shekhar Saxena, director of WHO’s department for mental health and substance abuse, said the agency accepted the proposal that gaming disorder should be listed as a new problem based on scientific evidence, in addition to “the need and the demand for treatment in many parts of the world.”
Dr. Joan Harvey, a spokeswoman for the British Psychological Society, warned that the new designation might cause unnecessary concern among parents.
“People need to understand this doesn’t mean every child who spends hours in their room playing games is an addict, otherwise medics are going to be flooded with requests for help,” she said.
Others welcomed WHO’s new classification, saying it was critical to identify people hooked on video games quickly because they are usually teenagers or young adults who don’t seek help themselves.
“We come across parents who are distraught, not only because they’re seeing their child drop out of school, but because they’re seeing an entire family structure fall apart,” said Dr. Henrietta Bowden-Jones, a spokeswoman for behavioral addictions at Britain’s Royal College of Psychiatrists. She was not connected to WHO’s decision.
Bowden-Jones said gaming addictions were usually best treated with psychological therapies but that some medicines might also work.
The American Psychiatric Association has not yet deemed gaming disorder to be a new mental health problem. In a 2013 statement, the association said it’s “a condition warranting more clinical research and experience before it might be considered for inclusion” in its own diagnostic manual.
The group noted that much of the scientific literature about compulsive gamers is based on evidence from young men in Asia.
“The studies suggest that when these individuals are engrossed in Internet games, certain pathways in their brains are triggered in the same direct and intense way that a drug addict’s brain is affected by a particular substance,” the association said in that statement. “The gaming prompts a neurological response that influences feelings of pleasure and reward, and the result, in the extreme, is manifested as addictive behavior.”
Dr. Mark Griffiths, who has been researching the concept of video gaming disorder for 30 years, said the new classification would help legitimize the problem and strengthen treatment strategies.
“Video gaming is like a non-financial kind of gambling from a psychological point of view,” said Griffiths, a distinguished professor of behavioral addiction at Nottingham Trent University. “Gamblers use money as a way of keeping score whereas gamers use points.”
He guessed that the percentage of video game players with a compulsive problem was likely to be extremely small — much less than 1 percent — and that many such people would likely have other underlying problems, like depression, bipolar disorder or autism.
WHO’s Saxena, however, estimated that 2 to 3 percent of gamers might be affected.
Griffiths said playing video games, for the vast majority of people, is more about entertainment and novelty, citing the overwhelming popularity of games like “Pokemon Go.”
“You have these short, obsessive bursts and yes, people are playing a lot, but it’s not an addiction,” he said.
Saxena said parents and friends of video game enthusiasts should still be mindful of a potentially harmful problem.
“Be on the lookout,” he said, noting that concerns should be raised if the gaming habit appears to be taking over.
“If (video games) are interfering with the expected functions of the person — whether it is studies, whether it’s socialization, whether it’s work — then you need to be cautious and perhaps seek help,” he said.