S. African locked up in Mozambique for unpaid hotel bill

Updated 10 November 2012
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S. African locked up in Mozambique for unpaid hotel bill

CAPE TOWN: A South African man has spent three months locked up in a police station in neighboring Mozambique over an unpaid hotel bill, Pretoria’s foreign ministry said Saturday. “He has been in detention for three months now,” said ministry spokesman Nelson Kgwete. “He visited Mozambique some time ago and when he left the hotel where he was staying, an allegation came up that he didn’t pay the bill.
So the hotel reported him to the police in Mozambique and he was apprehended and detained.” The family of Albert Smith, 40, has asked for help to settle the bill of around 18,000 meticals ($611, 481 euros) and an additional fine.
“We’re still in the process of facilitating the release of the man but we cannot ourselves as government pay the bill,” said Ngwete. “All we can do is to facilitate with his family so that they contact the relevant authorities in Mozambique and make the necessary arrangements.” The man has not been charged and is being held at a police station and not in a prison, he said.


Images of a father carrying his disabled son during graduation in Yemen tugs at the heart strings

Updated 19 April 2018
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Images of a father carrying his disabled son during graduation in Yemen tugs at the heart strings

  • Yemeni journalist and photographer Farouk Muqbel took footage of an elderly father in Sanaa

In video footage that will pull at the heart strings of even the most hardened, a proud father can be seen giving his disabled son a piggyback during his graduation ceremony in Yemen.  

The inspiring moment of the elderly man and his son was captured by Yemeni photojournalist Farouk Muqbel, who was filming the graduation ceremony of the Al-Noor Center for the Care and Rehabilitation of the Blind in Sanaa on Wednesday.

The father’s pride can be clearly seen as he carried his son who was graduating from secondary school.

The Al-Noor center was founded in 1967 and serves over 200 students, mostly children, who have visual disabilities.

The center’s manager told Human Rights Watch in 2016 that when the conflict started on March 26, 2015, the Houthis militia set up an office on the ground floor of the kindergarten building and placed guards at the compound’s entrance.