Samuels, Bravo lift West Indies in 2nd Test

Updated 23 November 2012
0

Samuels, Bravo lift West Indies in 2nd Test

KHULNA, Bangladesh: Marlon Samuels hit a fighting century to help the West Indies reach 241-2 at the close on the second day of the second and final Test against Bangladesh yesterday.
The 31-year-old Jamaican scored 109 not out and added 198 runs for the unfinished third wicket stand with Darren Bravo (85 not out) to help the tourists recover from the early loss of the openers at Sheikh Abu Naser Stadium.
The tourists, who lead the series 1-0 after winning the first Test in Dhaka by 77 runs, are now 146 behind Bangladesh’s first innings total of 387.
Samuels, a star in West Indies’s World Twenty20 triumph in Sri Lanka last month, drove spinner Shakib Al Hasan toward cover for his 11th boundary to complete his fifth Test hundred — and his third this year. By the end of play he had hit 13 boundaries and a six during his 231-ball resistance-filled knock after Kieran Powell (13) and Chris Gayle (25) were dismissed in the pre-lunch session.
Bravo, who hit seven boundaries during his sedate 197-ball knock, helped Samuels set a new record for third wicket against Bangladesh, beating the 179-run stand between Brian Lara and Ramnaresh Sarwan at Kingston in 2004.
Powell, who scored a century in each innings in the first Test, was caught at square-leg off a short delivery from paceman Rubel Hossain, while Gayle was well caught by wicketkeeper Mushfiqur Rahim off spinner Sohag Gazi.
West Indian captain Darren Sammy praised Samuels and Bravo.
“Both Samuels and Bravo played well. I think Marlon did not get runs in the first match so he was looking for runs here and I am happy that he got a hundred,” said Sammy. “Bravo was equally good and both gave us a good stand.”
Earlier, Bangladesh added 22 to their overnight score of 365-8.

Abul Hasan, who on Wednesday became only the second man in 135 years of Test cricket to score a debut hundred while batting at number 10, was last man out.
The 20-year-old left-hander hit 14 boundaries and three sixes during his 163-ball knock before being caught in the slips off a short Fidel Edwards delivery.
He fell just four short of equaling the highest ever individual score by a No. 10 batsman set by Walter Read for England against Australia at The Oval in 1884.
Mohammad Mahmudullah was dismissed in the third over of the day when he gave Sammy a return catch after scoring a solid 76.
He had helped Hasan add 184 runs for the ninth wicket to lift the home team from a precarious 193-8 on the first day.
Their partnership fell just 11 short of the world record ninth-wicket partnership by South African pair Mark Boucher and Pat Symcox against Pakistan in Johannesburg in 1998.
Mahmudullah hit nine boundaries during his almost three-hour stay.
Edwards was the pick of the bowlers with 6-90, his 12th five-wicket haul in Test matches. Sammy chipped in with 3-74.


Why even the #WengerOut brigade should lament Arsene Wenger's exit from Arsenal

Updated 21 April 2018
0

Why even the #WengerOut brigade should lament Arsene Wenger's exit from Arsenal

  • The Frenchman revolutionised the game in England across all leagues, not just the Premier League.
  • After initial success he found the going tough in the second half of his reign, but will still go down as an all-time great.

Over the past few seasons it has been fashionable to view Arsene Wenger as some sort of figure of fun — a man living in the past, left behind by the modern game, but too stubborn to realize it.
In time, though, even the most ardent, frothing-at-the-mouth #WengerOut believer would have to agree that the Frenchman will go down not just as one of the best managers Arsenal have had, but also among the greatest in English club football.
As with any caricature, there is a hint of truth in the picture created, crude as it sometimes is. Yes, Wenger’s past few years at the Emirates have been painful to watch. Yes, he was stubborn when it came to both activity in the transfer market and belief in his methods and tactics. Yes, it is fair to say he leaves the club, on the pitch at least, in a bit of a mess. And, yes, he should have left two or three years ago.
But if there is one thing that any sane fan should remember about Wenger’s 22 years as Arsenal boss, it is this: He was a game-changer, a manager who oversaw not only a revolution of the Gunners, but also of the English game.
As soon as Wenger landed in England in 1996, he banished Arsenal’s Tuesday drinking club and munching of Mars bars — in their place came stretching sessions and broccoli. Hardly profound or radical in today’s game, but this was the era when change in English football invariably meant no pies and pints on a Friday night.
The technical, passing, possession football that is now the norm for any side with ambitions to remain in the Premier League, let alone win it, and the idea that eating vegetables rather than a tub of lard would help player performance, were brought in by Wenger alone.
He won the double in his first full season in charge, signed unheralded foreign talent such as Emmanuel Petit and Patrick Viera — who went on to become world-class players — and created teams that were a joy to watch, culminating with “The Invincibles” of 2003-04, who won the Premier League without losing a match.
The irony is that the one-time revolutionary ended up being viewed as a throwback, a stuck-in-the-mud anachronism; a manager who harked back to a time when playing with the owner’s chequebook was not seen as the only path to success and when paragraphs were favored over 140 characters.
And that perhaps explains why so many Arsenal fans seemingly wanted him gone: Wenger is not of the Twitter generation, of instant opinions for the 24-hour news agenda and of hype over humility. The man who was once seen as the future stuck to principles that were deemed as belonging to the past.
It is clear there is a lot of bad blood at the club — a ridiculous Facebook post by an Arsenal fan claimed Wenger’s announcement he was leaving made it the “greatest day in Arsenal’s history.”
But for all the bluster and nonsense, Wenger’s legacy will be that of “The Invincibles” — one of the greatest club sides of modern times; of beautiful football played at pace and with artistry; of being a decent, yet flawed, man who was never anything but articulate and courteous.
Having been in charge of Arsenal for 22 years, he is undoubtedly the last of a kind, and in the era of trigger-happy owners, short-term fixes and sensationalism over stability, that is something everyone, even the #WengerOut brigade, should lament.