86% jobs ‘not fit for Saudis’

Updated 21 December 2012
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86% jobs ‘not fit for Saudis’

Labor Minister Adel Fakeih said yesterday that 86 percent of jobs done by expatriates are not suitable for Saudis. However, he said the new Saudization drive was aimed at creating more jobs for two million unemployed citizens.
Speaking to Al-Sharq daily, he said 85 percent of Saudi job seekers are women. “Moreover, 330,000 Saudis, who graduate from secondary schools every year, also look for jobs,” he added.
He said the new labor laws would help flush out coverup businesses that constitute 42 percent of small enterprises in the country.
“There are about eight million expatriate workers and 86 percent of them (6 million) do menial jobs that do not suit Saudis,” the minister said. Annual foreign transfers of expatriates would cross SR 130 billion by the end of this year, he added.
Fakeih said 68 percent of foreign workers in the Kingdom receive a monthly salary of less than SR 1,000 and 18 percent less than SR 2,000. “This means 86 percent of foreigners get low salaries.”


How Madinah residents prepare Ramadan meals at Prophet’s mosque

Updated 9 min 9 sec ago
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How Madinah residents prepare Ramadan meals at Prophet’s mosque

JEDDAH: The residents of Madinah have been using the Muslim holy month of Ramadan to take the opportunity to welcome worshippers at Al-Masjid An-Nabawi (the Prophet’s Mosque) and express their hospitality.
Iftar gatherings such as these bring the Madinah community together to socialize and challenge one another in performing good deeds.
The Saudi Press Agency (SPA) took a series of photos that reflect the Ramadan spirit at the Prophet’s mosque, with Madinah residents rushing to serve worshippers Iftar (break fast) meals prepared from the best local cuisine.
A unit dedicated to serving Iftar has provided a guide for those who want to serve meals. Servers are licensed to do so and are fully responsible for the quality of food. Any violations would result in canceling the license and giving the opportunity to another company.
The Iftar meals during Ramadan include tea, coffee, yogurt, bread, rice, meat, fruits and juices.
The food is served in areas of the mosque’s outside courts, designated for fasters to realx and enjoy their meals.
The Iftar meals are prepared right after Asr prayers, and organizers enter the mosque from special gates assigned to accomplish these tasks.
Food inspectors ensure that nothing but the permitted meals are allowed to be served for worshippers.
At sunset prayers, the meals are prepared, and right before prayers are held, the meals are distributed to provide space for worshippers to pray.